PCI-SIG “nificant” Changes Brewing in Mobile

PCI-SIG Developers Conference, June 25, 2013, Santa Clara, CA

Of five significant PCI Express announcements made at this week’s PCI-SIG Developers Conference, two are aimed at mobile embedded.

From PCI to PCI Express to Gen3 speeds, the PCI-SIG is one industry consortium that lets no grass grow for long. As the embedded, enterprise and server industries roll out PCIe Gen3 and 40G/100G Ethernet, the PCI-SIG and its key constituents like Cadence, Synopsis, LeCroy and others are readying for another speed doubling to 16 GT/s (giga transfers/second) by 2015. The PCIe 4.0 next step evolves bandwidth to 16Gb/s or a whopping 64 GB/s (big “B”) total lane bandwidth in x16 width. PCIe 4.0 Rev 0.5 will be available Q1 2014 with Rev 0.9 targeted for Q1 2015.

Table of major PCI-SIG announcements at Developers Conference 2013

Table of major PCI-SIG announcements at Developers Conference 2013

Yet as “SIG-nificant” as this announcement is, PCI-SIG president Al Yanes said it’s only one of five major news items. The others include: a PCIe 3.1 specification that consolidates a series of ECNs in the areas of power, performance and functionality; PCIe Outside the Box which uses a 1-3 meter “really cheap” copper cable called PCIe OCuLink with an 8G bit rate; plus two embedded and mobile announcements that I’m particularly enthused about. Refer to the table for a snapshot.

New M.2 Specification

The new M.2 specification is a small, mobile embedded form factor designed to replace the previous “Mini PCI” in Mini Card and Half Mini Card sizes. The newer, as-yet-publicly-unreleased M.2 card will be smaller in size and volume but is intended to provide scalable PCIe performance to allow designers to tune SWaP and I/O requirements. PCI-SIG marketing workgroup chair Ramin Neshati told me that M.2 is part of the PCI-SIG’s increased focus on mobile.

The scalable M.2 card is designed as an I/O plug in for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, WAN/cellular, SSD and other connectivity in platforms including ultrabook, tablet, and “maybe even smartphone,” said Neshati. At Rev 0.7 now, Rev 0.9 will be released soon and the final (Rev 1.0?) spec will become public by Q4 2013.

PCI-SIG M.2 card form factor

The PCI-SIG’s impending M.2 form factor is designed for mobile embedded ultrabooks, tablets, and possibly smartphones. The card will have a scalable PCIe interface and is designed for Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cellular, SSD and more. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

Mobile PCIe (M-PCIe)

Seeing the momentum in mobile and the interest in a PCIe on-board interconnect lead the PCI-SIG to work with the MIPI Alliance and create Mobile PCI Express: M-PCIe. The specification is now available to PCI-SIG members and creates an “adapted PCIe architecture” bridge between regular PCIe and MIPI M-PHY.

The Mobile PCI Express (M-PCIe) specification targets mobile embedded devices like smartphones to provide high-speed, on-board PCIe connectivity. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

The Mobile PCI Express (M-PCIe) specification targets mobile embedded devices like smartphones to provide high-speed, on-board PCIe connectivity. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

Using the MIPI M-PHY physical layer allows smartphone and mobile designers to stick with one consistent user interface across multiple platforms, including already-existing OS drivers. PCIe support is “baked into Windows, iOS, Android,” and others, says PCI-SIG’s Neshati.  PCI Express also has a major advantage when it comes to interoperability testing, which runs from the protocol stack all the way down to the electrical interfaces. Taken collectively, PCIe brings huge functionality and compliance benefits to the mobile space.

M-PCIe supports MIPI’s Gear 1 (1.25-1.45 Gbps), Gear 2 (2.5-2.9 Gbps) and Gear 3 (5.0-5.8 Gbps) speeds. As well, the M-PCIe spec provides power optimization for short channel mobile platforms, primarily aimed at WWAN front end radios, modem IP blocks, and possibly replacing MIPI’s own universal file storage UFS mass storage interface (administered by JEDEC).

M-PCIe by the PCI-SIG can be used in multiple high speed paths in a smartphone mobile device. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG and MIPI Alliance.)

M-PCIe by the PCI-SIG can be used in multiple high speed paths in a smartphone mobile device. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG and MIPI Alliance.)

PCI Express Ready for More

More information on these five announcements will be rolling out soon. But it’s clear that the PCI-SIG sees mobile and embedded as the next target areas for PCI Express in the post-PC era, while still not abandoning the standard’s bread and butter in PCs and high-end/high-performance servers.

 

Does Altera Have “Big Data” Communications on the Brain?

In wireless, wireline and financial “big data” applications, moving all those packets needs prodigious FPGA resources, not all of which Altera had before their recent series of acquisitions, partnerships, and otherwise wheeling-and-dealing.

Chris Balough of Altera (left) interviewed by Andy Frame from ARM. (Courtesy: YouTube.)

Chris Balough of Altera (left) interviewed by Andy Frame from ARM. (Courtesy: YouTube.)

I caught up with an old friend at April’s DESIGN West 2013 conference in San Jose: Chris Balough, Sr Director, Product Marketing for SoC products. I knew Chris from when he was at Triscend (purchased by Xilinx). Chris is now in charge of Altera’s SoC products which are Arria V, Stratix V and Cyclone FPGAs with ARM cores in them which compete with Xilinx’s Zynq devices. Chris shed some light on some of these announcements, but remained mum on what they all might mean taken collectively. I think they add up to something big in “Big Data”.

(Fun facts: Altera’s first “SoC” was Excalibur, no longer recommended for new designs. Altera’s most popular SoC processor is the soft Nios II, sold in roughly 30 percent of production SoCs, says Balough.)

X before A? We’ll See

Subconsciously I think of Xilinx first when the word “FPGA” is flashed in front of me, but Altera’s the company pushing more boundaries of late. Their rat-a-tat machine gun announcements this year got my attention.

In the summer of 2012, I did an interview with Altera’s Sr VP of R&D Brad Howe and he spread out as much of the roadmap on the table as he could. Things like HSA, OpenCL, and better gigabit transceivers were all on the horizon.  Shortly thereafter, Altera extended their  relationship with TSMC to 20nm for Arria and Cyclone FPGAs. Then in early 2013, they rocked the industry by locking up an exclusive FPGA relationship with Intel for the industry’s only production 14nm tri-gate FinFETs.

Spring Cleaning ; Altera’s Getting Ready For…?

Now in Spring 2013, Altera is making headlines like these:

- FPGA Design in the Cloud–Try It, You’ll Like It, Says Plunify. At DAC, Altera and Plunify are pushing cloud-based FPGA design tools. (See our February 2013 article with Plunify here.)

- Altera and AppliedMicro will Cooperate on Joint Solutions for High Growth Data Center Market.  Combines Stratix FPGAs and AppliedMicro’s Server on a Chip devices targeting data centers and optical transport networks (OTN).

- Altera Expands OTN Solution Capabilities with Acquisition of TPACK. Altera buys TPAK from AMCC to provide IP for FPGAs used in OTN for tasks like cross-bar switches used in 10/40/100Gbps PHYs.

- Altera Stratix V GX FPGAs Achieve PCIe Gen3 Compliance and Listing on PCI-SIG Integrators List. Right now, Gen2 and Gen3 PCIe is critical to data centers, cellular base stations, and all manner of high-speed long-haul/back-haul telco gear. Within 12 months, PCIe Gen2/3 will be “table stakes” in all manner of high-performance embedded systems like ATCA- or VME/VPX-based DSP systems for radar, sonar, SIGINT (signals intelligence) or data mining.

- Altera to Deliver Breakthrough Power Solutions for FPGAs with Acquisition of Power Technology Innovator Enpirion.  Maybe Enpirion’s DC-DC converter PowerSoCs with integrated inductors may some day end up inside a Stratix package (perhaps like Xilinx’s stacked chip interposer technology), but for now the two-chip solution reduces board space by 1/7 and simplifies system design considerably. The programmable DC-DC converters provide the multiple power rails–and power-up sequences–needed for big FPGAs.

The blue regions show places where FPGAs are used in wireless basestations.

The blue regions show places where FPGAs are used in wireless LTE basestations. (Courtesy: Altera.)

My Take: Altera’s Move in Big Data

Analysts estimate that nearly 50 percent of the revenue in  FPGAs comes from high end, high density, costly FPGAs like the Xilinx Vertex 7 and Altera Stratix V. Segments like wireless and wireline packet processing, plus financial or image processing algorithm processors increasingly rely on these kinds of FPGAs in lieu of ASICs, GPGPUs, or proprietary network processors. So every advantage in IP, process technology, or partnership that Altera has, gets the company one step closer to more design wins.

We’ll see what Altera does with all of these recent announcements. I’d expect to see something shake loose before the traditional “summer doldrums” set in when the semiconductor industry goes on its annual vacation next month in July.