AMD’s “Beefy” APUs Bulk Up Thin Clients for HP, Samsung

There are times when a tablet is too light, and a full desktop too much. The answer? A thin client PC powered by an AMD APU.

Note: this blog is sponsored by AMD.

A desire to remotely access my Mac and Windows machines from somewhere else got me thinking about thin client architectures. A thin “client” machine has sufficient processing for local storage and display—plus keyboard, mouse and other I/O—and is remotely connected to a more beefy “host” elsewhere. The host may be in the cloud or merely somewhere else on a LAN, sometimes intentionally inaccessible for security reasons.

Thin client architectures—or just “thin clients”—find utility in call centers, kiosks, hospitals, “smart” monitors and TVs, military command posts and other multi-user, virtualized installations. At times they’ve been characterized as low performance or limited in functionality, but that’s changing quickly.

They’re getting additional processing and graphics capability thanks to AMD’s G-Series and A-Series Accelerated Processing Units (APUs). By some analysts, AMD is number one in thin clients and the company keeps winning designs with its highly integrated x86 plus Radeon graphics SoCs: most recently with HP and Samsung.

HP’s t420 and mt245 Thin Clients

HP’s ENERGY STAR certified t420 is a fanless thin client for call centers, Desktop-as-a-service and remote kiosk environments (Figure 1). Intended to mount on the back of a monitor such as the company’s ProDisplays (like you see at the doctor’s office), the unit runs HP’s ThinPro 32 or Smart Zero Core 32 operating system, has either 802.11n Wi-Fi or Gigabit Ethernet, 8 GB of Flash and 2 GB of DDR3L SDRAM.

Figure 1: HP’s t420 thin client is meant for call centers and kiosks, mounted to a smart LCD monitor. (Courtesy: HP.)

Figure 1: HP’s t420 thin client is meant for call centers and kiosks, mounted to a smart LCD monitor. (Courtesy: HP.)

USB ports for keyboard and mouse supplement the t420’s dual display capability (DVI-D  and VGA)—made possible by AMD’s dual-core GX-209JA running at 1 GHz.

Says AMD’s Scott Aylor, corporate vice president and general manager, AMD Embedded Solutions: “The AMD Embedded G-Series SoC couples high performance compute and graphics capability in a highly integrated low power design. We are excited to see innovative solutions like the HP t420 leverage our unique technologies to serve a broad range of markets which require the security, reliability and low total cost of ownership offered by thin clients.”

The whole HP thin client consumes a mere 45W and according to StorageReview.com, will retail for $239.

Along the lines of a lightweight mobile experience, HP has also chosen AMD for their mt245 Mobile Thin Client (Figure 2). The thin client “cloud computer” resembles a 14-inch (1366 x 768 resolution) laptop with up to 4GB of SDRAM and a 16 GB SSD, the unit runs Windows Embedded Standard 7P 64 on AMD’s quad core A6-6310 APU with Radeon R4 GPU. There are three USB ports, 1 VGA and 1 HDMI, plus Ethernet and optional Wi-Fi.

Figure 2: HP’s mt245 is a thin client mobile machine, targeting healthcare, education, and more. (Courtesy: HP.)

Figure 2: HP’s mt245 is a thin client mobile machine, targeting healthcare, education, and more. (Courtesy: HP.)

Like the t420, the mt245 consumes a mere 45W and is intended for employee mobility but is configured for a thin client environment. AMD’s director of thin client product management, Stephen Turnbull says the mt245 targets “a whole range of markets, including education and healthcare.”

At the core of this machine, pun intended, is the Radeon GPU that provides heavy-lifting graphics performance. The mt245 can not only take advantage of virtualized cloud computing, but has local moxie to perform graphics-intensive applications like 3D rendering. Healthcare workers might, for example, examine ultrasound images. Factory technicians could pull up assembly drawings, then rotate them in CAD-like software applications.

Samsung Cloud Displays

An important part of Samsung’s displays business involves “smart” displays, monitors and televisions. Connected to the cloud or operating autonomously as a panel PC, many Samsung displays need local processing such as that provided by AMD’s APUs.

Samsung’s recently announced (June 17, 2015) 21.5-inch TC222W and 23.6-inch TC242W also use AMD G-Series devices in thin client architectures. The dual core 2.2 GHz GX222 with Radeon HD6290 powers both displays at 1920 x 1080 (HD) and provides six USB ports, Ethernet, and runs Windows Embedded 7 out of 4GB of RAM and 32 GB of SSD.

Figure 3: Samsung’s Cloud Displays also rely on AMD G-Series APUs.

Figure 3: Samsung’s Cloud Displays also rely on AMD G-Series APUs.

Said Seog-Gi Kim, senior vice president, Visual Display Business, Samsung Electronics, “Samsung’s powerful Windows Thin Client Cloud displays combine professional, ergonomic design with advanced thin-client technology.” The displays rely on the company’s Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) through a centrally managed data center that increases data security and control (Figure 3). Applications include education, business, healthcare, hospitality or any environment that requires virtualized security with excellent local processing and graphics.

Key to the design wins is the performance density of the G-Series APUs, coupled with legacy x86 software interoperability. The APUs–for both HP and Samsung–add more beef to thin clients.

 

Proprietary “Standards” Feel Way Too Controlling

In the embedded industry, we’re surrounded by standards. Most are open, some are not. Open is better.

I recently got torqued at getting held over the barrel once again for a proprietary embedded doodad–an Apple Lightning cable. All my old Apple cables are now useless, and Apple doesn’t use the very-open (and cheap!) micro-USB cable that’s standard everywhere.

Some common cables: only the Apple Lightning cable on the left is proprietary. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons, by Algr).

Some common cables: only the Apple Lightning cable on the left is proprietary. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons, by Algr).

Embedded boards also come with myriad open and not-so-open standards. If it’s not a standard managed by a consortium–say, PCIe-104 OneBank by the PC/104 Consortium, or SMARC by SGET–designers should carefully weigh the pro’s and con’s of choosing that vendor’s “standard”. Often, it makes sense. But beware of the commitment you’re making.

This is one reason that Linux, the world’s popular open source software, became so prevalent: devs and their employers could control their on destiny.

Check out my full rant here: http://bit.ly/1U4PYcS

 

Move Over Arduino, AMD and GizmoSphere Have a “Jump” On You with Graphics

The UK’s National Videogame Arcade relies on CPU, graphics, I/O and openness to power interactive exhibits.

Editor’s note: This blog is sponsored by AMD.

When I was a kid I was constantly fascinated with how things worked. What happens when I stick this screwdriver in the wall socket? (Really.) How come the dinner plate falls down and not up?

Humans have to try things for ourselves in order to fully understand them; this sparks our creativity and for many of us becomes a life calling.

Attempting to catalyze visitors’ curiosity, the UK’s National Videogame Arcade (NVA) opened in March 2015 with the sole intention of getting children and adults interested in videogames through the use of interactive exhibits, most of which are hands-on. The hope is that young people will first be stimulated by the games, and secondly that they someday unleash their creativity on the videogame and tech industries.

The UK's National Videogame Arcade promotes gaming through hands-on exhibits powered by GizmoSphere embedded hardware.

The UK’s National Videogame Arcade promotes gaming through hands-on exhibits powered by GizmoSphere embedded hardware.

 Might As Well “Jump!”

The NVA is located in a corner building with lots of curbside windows—imagine a fancy New York City department store but without the mannequins in the street-side windows. Spread across five floors and a total of 33,000 square feet, the place is a cooperative effort between GameCity (a nice bunch of gamers), the Nottingham City Council, and local Nottingham Trent University.

The goal of pulling in 60,000 visitors a year is partly achieved by the NVA’s signature exhibit “Jump!” that allows visitors to experience gravity (without the plate) and how it affects videogame characters like those in Donkey Kong or Angry Birds. Visitors actually get to jump on the Jump-o-tron, a physics-based sensor that’s controlled by GizmoSphere’s Gizmo 2 development board.

The Jumpotron uses AMD's G-Series SoC combining an x86 and Radeon GPU.

The Jumpotron uses AMD’s G-Series SoC combining an x86 and Radeon GPU.

The heart of Gizmo 2 is AMD’s G-Series APU, combining a 64-bit x86 CPU and Radeon graphics processor. Gizmo 2 is the latest creation from the GizmoSphere nonprofit open source community which seeks to “bring the power of a supercomputer and the I/O capabilities of a microcontroller to the x86 open source community,” according to www.gizmosphere.org.

The open source Gizmo 2 runs Windows and Linux, bridging PC games to the embedded world.

The open source Gizmo 2 runs Windows and Linux, bridging PC games to the embedded world.

Jump!” allows visitors to experience—and tweak—gravity while examining the effect upon on-screen characters. The combination requires extensive processing—up to 85 GFLOPS worth—plus video manipulation and display. What’s amazing is that “Jump!”, along with many other NVA exhibits, isn’t powered by rackmount servers but rather by the tiny 4 x 4 inch Gizmo 2 that supports Direct X 11.1, OpenGL 4.2x, and OpenCL 1.2. It also runs Windows and Linux.

AMD’s “G” Powers Gizmo 2

Gizmo 2 is a dense little package, sporting HDMI, Ethernet, PCIe, USB (2.0 and 3.0), plus myriad other A/V and I/O such as A/D/A—all of them essential for NVA exhibits like “Jump!” Says Ian Simons of the NVA, “Gizmo 2 is used in many of our games…and there are plans for even more games embedded into the building,” including furniture and even street-facing window displays.

Gizmo 2’s small size and support for open source software and hardware—plus the ability to develop on the gamer’s Unity engine—makes Gizmo 2 the preferred choice. Yet the market contains ample platforms from which to choose. Arduino comes to mind.

Gizmo 2's schematic.

Gizmo 2′s schematic. The x86 G-Series SoC is loaded with I/O.

Compared to Arduino, the AMD G Series SoC (GX-210HA) powering Gizmo 2 is orders of magnitude more powerful, plus it’s x86 based and running at 1.0GHz (the integral GPU runs at 300 MHz). This makes the world’s cache of Intel-oriented, Windows-based software and drivers available to Gizmo 2—including some server-side programs. “NVA can create projects with Gizmo 2, including 3D graphics and full motion video, with plenty of horsepower,” says Simons. He’s referring to some big projects already installed at the NVA, plus others in the planning stages.

“One of things we’d like to do,” Simons says, “is continue to integrate Gizmo 2 into more of the building to create additional interactive exhibits and displays.” The small size of Gizmo 2, plus the wickedly awesome performance/graphics rendering/size/Watt of the AMD G-Series APU, allows Gizmo 2 to be embedded all over the building.

See Me, Feel Me

With a nod to The Who’s (1) rock opera Tommy, the NVA building will soon have more Gizmo 2 modules wired into the infrastructure, mixing images and sound. There are at least three projects in the concept stage:

  • DMX addressable logic in the central stairway.  With exposed cables and beams, visitors would be able to control the audio, video, and possibly LED lighting of the stairwell area using a series of switches. The author wonders if voice or other tactile feedback would create all manner of immersive “psychedelic” A/V in the stairwell central hall.
  • Controllable audio zones in the rooftop garden. The NVA’s Yamaha-based sound system already includes 40 zones. Adding AMD G-Series horsepower to these zones would allow visitors to create individually customized light/sound shows, possibly around botanical themes. Has there ever been a Little Shop of Horrors videogame where the plants eat the gardener? I wonder.
  • Sidewalk animation that uses all those street-facing windows to animate the building, possibly changing the building’s façade (Star Trek cloak, anyone?) or even individually controlling games inside the building from outside (or presenting inside activities to the outside). Either way, all those windows, future LCDs, and reams of I/O will require lots more Gizmo 2 embedded boards.

The Gizmo 2 costs $199 and is available from several retailers such as Element14. With Gerber schematics and all the board-focused software open source, it’s no wonder this x86 embedded board is attractive to gamers. With AMD’s G-Series APU onboard, the all-in-one HDK/SDK is an ideal choice for embedded designs—and those future gamers playing with the Gizmo 2 at the UK’s NVA.

BTW: The Who harkened from London, not Nottingham.