What’s the Nucleus of Mentor’s Push into Industrial Automation?

Mentor’s once nearly-orphaned Nucleus RT forms the foundation of a darned impressive software suite for controlling meat packing or nuclear power plants.

GlassesEveryone appreciates an underdog—the pale, wimpy kid with glasses and brown polyester sweater who gets routinely beaten up by the popular boys—but sticks it out day after day and eventually grows up to create a tech start-up everyone loves. (Part of this story is my personal history; I’ll let you guess which part.)

So it is with Mentor’s Nucleus RTOS, which the company announced forms the basis for the recent initiative into Industrial Automation (I.A.). Announced this week at the ARC Industry Forum in Orlando is Mentor’s “Embedded Solution for Industrial Automation” (Figure 1).  A cynic might look at this figure as a collection of existing Mentor products…slightly rearranged to make a compelling argument for a “solution” in the I.A. space.  That skinny kid Nucleus is right there, listed on the diagram. Oh, how many times have I asked Mentor why they keep Nucleus around only to get beaten up by the big RTOS kids!

Figure 1: Mentor’s Industrial Automation Solution for embedded, IoT-enabled systems relies on the Nucleus RTOS, including a secure hypervisor and enhanced security infrastructure.

Figure 1: Mentor’s Industrial Automation Solution for embedded, IoT-enabled systems relies on the Nucleus RTOS, including a secure hypervisor and enhanced security infrastructure. 

After all, you’ll recognize Mentor’s Embedded Linux, the Nucleus RTOS I just mentioned, and the company’s Sourcery debug/analyzer/IDE product suite. All of these have been around for a while, although Nucleus is the grown-up kid in this bunch. (Pop quiz: True or False…Did all three of these products came from Mentor acquisitions? Bonus question: From what company(ies)?)

Into this mix, Mentor is adding new security tools from our friends at Icon Labs, plus hooks to a hot new automation GUI/HMI called Qt. (Full disclosure: Icon Labs founder Alan Grau is one of our security bloggers; however, we were taken by surprise at this recent Mentor announcement!)

Industry 4.0: I.A. meets IoT

According to Mentor’s Director of Product Management for Runtime Solutions, Warren Kurisu (whose last name is pronounced just like my first name in Japanese: Ku-ri-su), I.A. is gaining traction, big time. There’s a term for it: “Industry 4.0”. The large industrial automation vendors—like GE, Siemens, Schneider Electric, and others—have long been collecting factory data and feeding it into the enterprise, seeking to reduce costs, increase efficiency, and tie systems into the supply chain. Today, we call this concept the Internet of Things (IoT) and Industry 4.0 is basically the promise of interoperability between currently bespoke (and proprietary) I.A. systems with smart, connected IoT devices plus a layer of cyber security thrown in.

Mentor’s Kurisu points out that what’s changed is not only the kinds of devices that will connect into I.A. systems, but how they’ll connect in more ways than via serial SCADA or FieldBus links. Industrial automation will soon include all the IoT pipes we’re reading about: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth LE, various mesh topologies, Ethernet, cellular—basically whatever works and is secure.

The Skinny Kid Prevails

Herein lies the secret of Mentor’s Industrial Automation Solution. It just so happens the company has most of what you’d need to connect legacy I.A. systems to the IoT, plus add new kinds of smart embedded sensors into the mix. What’s driving the whole market is cost. According to a recent ARC survey, reduced downtime, improved process performance, reduced  machine lifecycle costs—all of these, and more, are leading I.A. customers and vendors to upgrade their factories and systems.

Additionally, says Mentor’s Kurisu, having the ability to consolidate multiple pieces of equipment, reduce power, improve safety, and add more local, operator-friendly graphics are criteria for investing in new equipment, sensors, and systems.

Mentor brings something to the party in each of these areas:

- machine or system convergence, either by improved system performance or reduced footprint

- capabilities and differentiation, allowing I.A. vendors to create systems different from “the other guys”

- faster time-to-money, done through increased productivity, system design and debug, or anything to reduce the I.A. vendor’s and their customer’s efforts.

Graphic - Industrial Automation Flow

Figure 2: Industrial automation a la Mentor. The embedded pieces rely on Nucleus RTOS, or variations thereof. New Qt software for automation GUI’s plus security gateways from Icon Labs bring security and IoT into legacy I.A. installations.

Figure 2 sums up the Mentor value proposition, but notice how most of the non-enterprise blocks in the diagram are built upon the Nucleus RTOS.

Nucleus, for example, has achieved safety certification by TÜV SÜD complete with artifacts (called Nucleus SafetyCert). Mentor’s Embedded Hypervisor—a foundational component of some versions of Nucleus—can be used to create a secure partitioned environment for either multicore or multiple processors (heterogeneous or homogeneous), in which to run multiple operating systems which won’t cross-pollute in the event of a virus or other event.

New to the Mentor offering is an industry-standard Qt GUI running on Linux, or Qt optimized for embedded instantiations running on—wait for it—Nucleus RTOS. Memory and other performance optimizations reduce the footprint, boot faster, and there are versions now for popular IoT processors such as ARM’s Cortex-Mx cores.

Playground Victory: The Take-away

So if the next step in Industrial Automation is Industry 4.0—the rapid build-out of industrial systems reducing cost, adding IoT capabilities with secure interoperability—then Mentor has a pretty compelling offering. That consolidation and emphasis on low power I mentioned above can be had for free via capabilities already build into Nucleus.

For example, embedded systems based on Nucleus can intelligently turn off I/O and displays and even rapidly drive multicore processors into their deepest sleep modes. One example explained to me by Mentor’s Kurisu showed an ARM-based big.LITTLE system that ramped performance when needed but kept the power to a minimum. This is possible, in part, by Mentor’s power-aware drivers for an entire embedded I.A. system under the control of Nucleus.

And  in the happy ending we all hope for, it looks like the maybe-forgotten Nucleus RTOS—so often ignored by editors like me writing glowingly about Wind River’s VxWorks or Green Hill’s INTEGRITY—well, maybe Nucleus has grown up.  It’s the RTOS ready to run the factory of the future. Perhaps your electricity is right now generated under the control of the nerdy little RTOS that made it big.

Some insight into Altera’s Stratix 10 plans

Hint: Intel’s 14nm tri-gate (FinFET) process is at the core (no pun) of Altera’s recipe, but architecture and software tools round out new FPGA family plans.

Figure 5 Altera SoC roadmap (PNG)First to announce plans for a quad-core ARM Cortex A53-based SoC FPGA, Altera will rely on their Intel fab exclusivity to provide what an Altera spokesman called “unimaginable performance”. One of the titans in the FPGA market (the other is Xilinx), Altera has been slowly opening the curtain on their roadmap plans.

I’ve been following and reporting on Altera’s announcements, acquisitions, and possible strategies for the last 12 months. Now, all is revealed in the company’s Stratix 10 technology announcement. An in-depth report (with links) is available here.

Editor’s note: While Altera is announcing their technology plans, Xilinx announced new 20nm devices in Virtex and Kintex UltraScale devices. Our in-depth report on Xilinx will follow shortly.  C. Ciufo, editor.

Intel’s Atom Roadmap Makes Smartphone Headway

After being blasted by users and pundits over the lack of “low power” in the Atom product line, new architecture and design wins show Intel’s making progress.

Intel EVP Dadi Permutter revealing early convertible tablet computer at IDF2012.

Intel EVP Dadi Permutter revealing early convertible tablet computer at IDF2012.

A 10-second Google search on “Intel AND smartphone” reveals endless pundit comments on how Intel hasn’t been winning enough in the low power, smartphone and tablet markets.  Business publications wax endlessly on the need for Intel’s new CEO Brian Krzanich to make major changes in company strategy, direction, and executive management in order to decisively win in the portable market. Indications are that Krzanich is shaking things up, and pronto.

Forecasts by IDC (June 2013) and reported by CNET.com (http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57588471-94/shipments-of-smartphones-tablets-and-oh-yes-pcs-to-top-1.7b/) peg the PC+smartphone+tablet TAM at 1.7B units by 2014, of which 82 percent (1.4B units, $500M USD) are low power tablets and smart phones. And until recently, I’ve counted only six or so public wins for Intel devices in this market (all based upon the Atom Medfield SoC with Saltwell ISA I wrote about at IDF 2012). Not nearly enough for the company to remain the market leader while capitalizing on its world-leading tri-gate 3D fab technology.

Behold the Atom, Again

Fortunately, things are starting to change quickly. In June, Samsung announced that the Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch SKU would be powered by Intel’s Z2560 “Clover Trail+” Atom SoC running at 1.2GHz.  According to PC Magazine, “it’ll be the first Intel Android device released in the U.S.” (http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2420726,00.asp)and it complements other Galaxy Tab 3 offerings with competing processors. The 7-inch SKU uses a dual-core Marvell chip running Android 4.1, while the 8-inch SKU uses Samsung’s own Exynos dual-core Cortex-A9 ARM chip running Android 4.2. The Atom Z2560 also runs Android 4.2 on the 10.1-incher. Too bad Intel couldn’t have won all three sockets, especially since Intel’s previous lack of LTE cellular support has been solved by the company’s new XMM 7160 4G LTE chip, and supplemented by new GPS/GNSS silicon and IP from Intel’s ST-Ericsson navigation chip acquisition.

The Z2560 Samsung chose is one of three “Clover Trail+” platform SKUs (Z2760, Z2580, Z2560) formerly known merely as “Cloverview” when the dual-core, Saltwell-based, 32-nm Atom SoCs were leaked in Fall 2012. The Intel alphabet soup starts getting confusing because the Atom roadmap looks like rush hour traffic feeding out of Boston’s Sumner tunnel. It’s being pushed into netbooks (for maybe another quarter or two); value laptops and convertible tablets as standalone CPUs; smartphones and tablets as SoCs; and soon into the data center to compete against ARM’s onslaught there, too.

Clover Trail+ replaces Intel’s Medfield smartphone offering and was announced at February’s MWC 2013. According to Anandtech.com (thank you, guys!) Intel’s aforementioned design wins with Atom used the 32nm Medfield SoC for smartphones. Clover Trail is still at 32nm using the Saltwell microarchitecture but has targeted Windows 8 tablets, while Clover Trail+ targets only smartphones and non-Windows Tablets. That explains the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch design win. The datasheet for Clover Trail+ is here, and shows a dual-core SoC with multiple video CODECs, integrated 2D/3D graphics, on-board crypto, multiple multimedia engines such as Intel Smart Sound, and it’s optimized for Android and presumably, Intel/Samsung’s very own HTML5-based Tizen OS (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Intel Clover Trail+ block diagram used in the Atom Z2580, Z2560, and Z2520 smartphone SoCs. This is 32nm geometry based upon the Saltwell microarchitecture and replaces the previous Medfield single core SoC. (Courtesy: Intel.)

Figure 1: Intel Clover Trail+ block diagram used in the Atom Z2580, Z2560, and Z2520 smartphone SoCs. This is 32nm geometry based upon the Saltwell microarchitecture and replaces the previous Medfield single core SoC. (Courtesy: Intel.)

I was unable to find meaningful power consumption numbers for Clover Trail+, but it’s 32nm geometry compares favorably to ARM’s Cortex-A15 28nm geometry so Intel should be in the ballpark (vs Medfield’s 45nm). Still, the market wonders if Intel finally has the chops to compete. At least it’s getting much, much closer–especially once the on-board graphics performance gets factored into the picture compared to ARM’s lack thereof (for now).

Silvermont and Bay Trail and…Many More Too Hard to Remember

But Intel knows they’ve got more work to do to compete against Qualcomm’s home-grown Krait ARM-based ISA, some nVidia offerings, and Samsung’s own in-house designs. Atom will soon be moving to 22nm and the next microarchitecture is called Silvermont. Intel is finally putting power curves up on the screen, and at product launch I’m hopeful there will be actual Watt numbers shown, too.

For example, Intel is showing off Silvermont’s “industry-leading performance-per-Watt efficiency” (Figure 2). Press data from Intel says the architecture will offer 3x peak performance, or 5x lower power compared to the Clover Trail+ Saltwell microarchitecture. More code names to track: the quad-core Bay Trail SoC for 2013 holiday tablets; Merrifield with increased performance and battery life; and finally Avoton that provides 64-bit energy efficiency for micro servers and boasts ECC, Intel VT and possibly vPro and other security features. Avoton will go head-to-head with ARM in the data center where Intel can’t afford to lose any ground.

Figure 2: The 22nm Atom microarchitecture called Silvermont will appear in Bay Trail, Avoton and other future Atom SoCs from "Device to Data Center", says Intel. (Courtesy: Intel.)

Figure 2: The 22nm Atom microarchitecture called Silvermont will appear in Bay Trail, Avoton and other future Atom SoCs from “Device to Data Center”, says Intel. (Courtesy: Intel.)

Oh Yeah? Who’s Faster Now?

As Intel steps up its game because it has to win or else, the competition is not sitting still. ARM licensees have begun shipping big.LITTLE SoCs, and the company has announced new graphics, DSP, and mid-range cores. (Read Jeff Bier and BDTi’s excellent recent ARM roadmap overview here.)

A recent report by ABI Research (June 2013) tantalized (or more appropriately galvanized) the embedded and smartphone markets with the headline “Intel Apps Processor Outperforms NVIDA, Qualcomm, Samsung”. In comparison tests, ABI Research VP of engineering Jim Mielke noted that that Intel Atom Z2580  ”not only outperformed the competition in performance but it did so with up to half the current drain.”

The embedded market didn’t necessarily agree with the results, and UBM Tech/EETimes published extensive readers’ comments with colorful opinions.  On a more objective note, Qualcomm launched its own salvo as we went to press, predicting “you’ll see a whole bunch of tablets based upon the Snapdragon 800 in the market this year,” said Raj Talluri, SVP at Qualcomm, as reported by Bloomberg Businessweek.

Qualcomm  has made its Snapdragon product line more user-friendly and appears to be readying the line for general embedded market sales in Snapdragon 200, 400, 600, and “premium” 800 SKU versions. The company has made available development tools (mydragonboard.org/dev-tools) and is selling COM-like Dragonboard modules through partners such as Intrinsyc.

Intel Still Inside

It’s looking like a sure thing that Intel will finally have competitive silicon to challenge ARM-based SoCs in the market that really matters: mobile, portable, and handheld. 22nm Atom offerings are getting power-competitive, and the game will change to an overall system integration and software efficiency exercise.

Intel has for the past five years been emphasizing a holistic all-system view of power and performance. Their work with Microsoft has wrung out inefficiencies in Windows and capitalizes on microarchitecture advantages in desktop Ivy Bridge and Haswell CPUs. Security is becoming important in all markets, and Intel is already there with built-in hardware, firmware, and software (through McAfee and Wind River) advantages. So too has the company radically improved graphics performance in Haswell and Clover Trail+ Atom SoCs…maybe not to the level of AMD’s APUs, but absolutely competitive with most ARM-based competitors.

And finally, Intel has hedged its bets in Android and HTML5. They are on record as writing more Android code (for and with Google) than any other company, and they’ve migrated past MeeGo failures to the might-be-successful HTML5-based Tizen OS which Samsung is using in select handsets.

As I’ve said many times, Intel may be slow to get it…but it’s never good to bet against them in the long run. We’ll have to see how this plays out.

PCI-SIG “nificant” Changes Brewing in Mobile

PCI-SIG Developers Conference, June 25, 2013, Santa Clara, CA

Of five significant PCI Express announcements made at this week’s PCI-SIG Developers Conference, two are aimed at mobile embedded.

From PCI to PCI Express to Gen3 speeds, the PCI-SIG is one industry consortium that lets no grass grow for long. As the embedded, enterprise and server industries roll out PCIe Gen3 and 40G/100G Ethernet, the PCI-SIG and its key constituents like Cadence, Synopsis, LeCroy and others are readying for another speed doubling to 16 GT/s (giga transfers/second) by 2015. The PCIe 4.0 next step evolves bandwidth to 16Gb/s or a whopping 64 GB/s (big “B”) total lane bandwidth in x16 width. PCIe 4.0 Rev 0.5 will be available Q1 2014 with Rev 0.9 targeted for Q1 2015.

Table of major PCI-SIG announcements at Developers Conference 2013

Table of major PCI-SIG announcements at Developers Conference 2013

Yet as “SIG-nificant” as this announcement is, PCI-SIG president Al Yanes said it’s only one of five major news items. The others include: a PCIe 3.1 specification that consolidates a series of ECNs in the areas of power, performance and functionality; PCIe Outside the Box which uses a 1-3 meter “really cheap” copper cable called PCIe OCuLink with an 8G bit rate; plus two embedded and mobile announcements that I’m particularly enthused about. Refer to the table for a snapshot.

New M.2 Specification

The new M.2 specification is a small, mobile embedded form factor designed to replace the previous “Mini PCI” in Mini Card and Half Mini Card sizes. The newer, as-yet-publicly-unreleased M.2 card will be smaller in size and volume but is intended to provide scalable PCIe performance to allow designers to tune SWaP and I/O requirements. PCI-SIG marketing workgroup chair Ramin Neshati told me that M.2 is part of the PCI-SIG’s increased focus on mobile.

The scalable M.2 card is designed as an I/O plug in for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, WAN/cellular, SSD and other connectivity in platforms including ultrabook, tablet, and “maybe even smartphone,” said Neshati. At Rev 0.7 now, Rev 0.9 will be released soon and the final (Rev 1.0?) spec will become public by Q4 2013.

PCI-SIG M.2 card form factor

The PCI-SIG’s impending M.2 form factor is designed for mobile embedded ultrabooks, tablets, and possibly smartphones. The card will have a scalable PCIe interface and is designed for Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cellular, SSD and more. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

Mobile PCIe (M-PCIe)

Seeing the momentum in mobile and the interest in a PCIe on-board interconnect lead the PCI-SIG to work with the MIPI Alliance and create Mobile PCI Express: M-PCIe. The specification is now available to PCI-SIG members and creates an “adapted PCIe architecture” bridge between regular PCIe and MIPI M-PHY.

The Mobile PCI Express (M-PCIe) specification targets mobile embedded devices like smartphones to provide high-speed, on-board PCIe connectivity. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

The Mobile PCI Express (M-PCIe) specification targets mobile embedded devices like smartphones to provide high-speed, on-board PCIe connectivity. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG.)

Using the MIPI M-PHY physical layer allows smartphone and mobile designers to stick with one consistent user interface across multiple platforms, including already-existing OS drivers. PCIe support is “baked into Windows, iOS, Android,” and others, says PCI-SIG’s Neshati.  PCI Express also has a major advantage when it comes to interoperability testing, which runs from the protocol stack all the way down to the electrical interfaces. Taken collectively, PCIe brings huge functionality and compliance benefits to the mobile space.

M-PCIe supports MIPI’s Gear 1 (1.25-1.45 Gbps), Gear 2 (2.5-2.9 Gbps) and Gear 3 (5.0-5.8 Gbps) speeds. As well, the M-PCIe spec provides power optimization for short channel mobile platforms, primarily aimed at WWAN front end radios, modem IP blocks, and possibly replacing MIPI’s own universal file storage UFS mass storage interface (administered by JEDEC).

M-PCIe by the PCI-SIG can be used in multiple high speed paths in a smartphone mobile device. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG and MIPI Alliance.)

M-PCIe by the PCI-SIG can be used in multiple high speed paths in a smartphone mobile device. (Courtesy: PCI-SIG and MIPI Alliance.)

PCI Express Ready for More

More information on these five announcements will be rolling out soon. But it’s clear that the PCI-SIG sees mobile and embedded as the next target areas for PCI Express in the post-PC era, while still not abandoning the standard’s bread and butter in PCs and high-end/high-performance servers.

 

HTML5 Is What’s Needed To Rapidly Develop IVI Automotive Apps

HTML5 logo

Car manufacturers know that in-car technology like navigation systems sells cars. The pace of the smartphone movement is impacting the painfully slow speed with which automotive manufacturers develop new cars and tech features. Consumers trade out their phones every 2 years, but a two year old car is still considered nearly “new” by Kelly Blue Book. So how can the auto OEMs satisfy consumers’ tastes for updated, red-hot in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems and add-on Apps?

Elektrobit speaks about HTML5, IVI, and HMI for automotive markets

Automotive software supplier Elektrobit thinks HTML5 is the answer. Coincidentally, so does RIM’s QNX division, along with Intel.  QNX supplies “CAR 2″ software to several auto OEMs, and Intel is behind Tizen, an HTML5-based competitor to Android.  While Samsung has endorsed Tizen for a handful of smartphones, Intel has publicly stated that Tizen is also targeting automotive IVI systems as I wrote about here.

At a webinar today (5 March 2013) hosted by Automotive World magazine, Elektrobit’s VP of Automotive Rainer Holve, argued that HTML5 is the perfect language in which to develop and deploy the fast-changing IVI HMI software. Most importantly, the car’s core “native” IVI functions should stay separate and subject to safety-critical coding practices.

By partitioning the IVI software in this manner, the two ecosystems are decoupled and can run on their own market- and OEM-driven schedules.  This means that native IVI–like GPS navigation, audio, HVAC, or OBDII diagnostic information like fuel consumption–can be developed slowly and methodically on the typical 2-5+ year automobile OEM cycle.

But the faster moving, consumer smartphone inspired IVI portion, and its fast moving add-on Apps ecosystem, can move very, very quickly. This allows consumers to refresh not only the Apps, but alows the OEMs to upgrade the entire HMI experience every few years without having to replace the whole car.

HTML5 decouples the slow automotive dev cycle, from the super-fast IVI App cycle.

HTML5 decouples the slow automotive dev cycle, from the super-fast IVI App cycle.

While the OEMs would love for an HMI refresh to force the consumer to replace the car every two years, it’s not going to happen. HMTL5 is a reasonable alternative and they know it. According to Elektrobit, Chrysler, GM, and Jaguar/Land Rover (JLR) have already started projects with HTML5.

HTML5 is an “evolution and cleanup of previous HTML standards,” said Elektrobit’s Holve, and is composed of HTML+CSS+JavaScript, along with new features for A/V, 2D graphics canvas, a 3D API, support for hardware acceleration, and much more.  HTML5 is based upon open standards and is supported by Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Independently, W3C is working on a standardized API for JavaScript, which makes the HTML5 value proposition even sweeter.

Besides decoupling the HMI software from the “core” HMI functions, HTML5 would allow third-party Apps developers to swiftly write and deploy applications for IVI systems. Besides Internet connectivity itself, this is the one IVI feature that consumers demand: a choice of what Apps to add whenever they so choose. And since every automobile OEM will have to certify an App for safe in-vehicle use with their particular system, HTML5 allows App developers to create one core App that can be easily modified for multiple manufacturers and their myriad (and differentiated) vehicle models.  In short: HTML5 makes things easier for everyone, yet still allows a robust third-party market to flourish.

It’s important to note how this is both similar to, and differs from, the current IVI strategy of many OEMs that rely solely on the smartphone for Apps. Chevrolet, Peugeot, Renault, Toyota and v others tether the smartphone to the IVI system and “mirror” the phone’s Apps on the screen (see my blog on Mirroring). This allows the wildly robust iOS and Android App ecosystems into the car (and soon RIM/Blackberry and Windows 8 Phone), but it comes at a price.

2013 Chevrolet MyLink IVI uses MirrorLink with smartphone apps

2013 Chevrolet MyLink IVI uses MirrorLink with smartphone apps

In this scenario, the auto OEM must certify every App individually for use in their vehicle to assure safety or that critical car systems can’t be hacked or compromised. Or, the OEM can allow all Apps to run and hope for the best. One hopes a rogue App doesn’t access the CAN bus and apply the ABS or electric steering.

HTML5, on the other hand, gently forces developers to create Apps destined for IVI systems, but adds only a slight burden on them to make minor changes for each manufacturer’s certification. In this way they’re not barred from the car indiscriminately, but can develop a business of IVI apps separate from their smartphone iOS, Android and other Apps.

Intel's Renee James is betting on HTML5 in Tizen to kickstart transparent computing. (Image taken by author at IDF 2012.)

Intel’s Renee James is betting on HTML5 in Tizen to kickstart transparent computing. (Image taken by author at IDF 2012.)

Will HTML5 be successful? Is it the right answer for the rabid consumer’s taste for car tech, while still giving the auto manufacturer the safety and security they’re required to offer by law? I was skeptical about Tizen until Samsung’s announcements at Mobile World Congress 2013 last month. With Tizen pushing HTML5 for “openness”, it may just gain traction in automotive, too.

Watch this space. We’ll keep you updated.

“Mirror, Mira” on the Car’s IVI Screen: Two Different Standards?

You might be hearing about a new technology called MirrorLink that mimics your smartphone’s screen on the larger nav screen in your “connected car”. Or, you might be following the news on Miracast, a more open standard now baked into Android that offers Apple AirPlay-like features to stream smartphone content to devices like connected TVs.

You’d be forgiven if you think the two similarly-named standards are trying to accomplish the same thing. I didn’t understand it either, so I did some digging. Here’s what I found out.

The Smart, Connected Car
When I attended the Paris Auto Show last Fall specifically to investigate in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) trends for the Barr Group under contract to Intel, I got spun up “right quick” on all manner of IVI. From BMW’s iDrive to Chevrolet’s MyLink, the connected car is here. In fact, it’s one of the biggest trends spotted at last week’s 2013 CES in Las Vegas. MirrorLink is being designed into lots of new cars.

BMW's iDrive IVI uses a native system and doesn't rely on smartphone mirroring.

BMW’s iDrive IVI uses a native system and doesn’t rely on smartphone mirroring. (Courtesy of BMW.)

The biggest question faced by every auto manufacturer is this: in-car native system, or rely on the apps in one’s smartphone? Ford’s industry breakthrough MyFord Touch with SYNC by Microsoft is native and based upon Microsoft Auto Platform (now called Windows Embedded Automotive 7). Elsewhere, premium brands like BMW, Lexus and Cadillac have designed self-contained systems from the ground up. Some, like BMW, include in-car cellular modems. Others rely on the smartphone only for music and Internet access, but that’s it.

2013 Chevrolet MyLink IVI uses MirrorLink with smartphone apps

2013 Chevrolet MyLink IVI uses MirrorLink with smartphone apps. (Courtesy of Chevrolet.)

Still others, like Toyota and Chevrolet use a technology called MirrorLink to “mirror” the smartphone’s screen onto the car’s larger IVI. For all apps that make sense to be viewed on the IVI, the system will display them — usually identically to what the user sees on the smartphone (subject to safety and distraction caveats).

MirrorLink is now a trademarked standard owned by the Car Connectivity Consortium that’s designed specifically for cars and smartphones. That means the standard worries about driver distractions, apps that make sense for drivers (such as Google Maps) and those that don’t (such as a panoramic camera stitching application). Apps have to be qualified for use with MirrorLink.

As well, MirrorLink replaces the phone’s touch I/O with in-car I/O such as steering wheel controls, console joysticks, or the IVI head unit’s touchscreen or bezel buttons. Equally as important, audio input from microphones is routed from the car to the phone, while output uses the car’s speakers. The car’s antennae for radio and GPS will be given preference over the phone’s, improving the signal reception.  The protocols between smartphone and car also take input from the vehicle’s CANbus, including speed. This means that you can check your email when parked, but not while driving. A great resource for how it works and what the future holds is here.

MirrorLink started as a Nokia idea that was intended for smartphone-to-car connectivity. Now at version 1.1, it’s a client-server architecture where the IVI head unit is the USB host.  It uses industry-standard protocols such as Internet Protocol (IP), USB, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth (BT HFP for telephony, BT A2DP for media), RTP, and UPnP. Recent additions use The Trusted Computing Group concepts of device attestation protocols with SKSD/PKSD keys via authentication. The actual screen sharing uses the VNC protocol.

MirrorLink and Trusted Computing Group authentication process for trusted content.

MirrorLink and Trusted Computing Group authentication process for trusted content. (Courtesy of Car Connectivity Consortium.)

What MirrorLink doesn’t yet support is video streaming, since drivers watching video is a no-no is cars (tell that to the Japanese who I’ve seen with TVs mounted in their cars!).

Android and Miracast
Miracast, on the other hand, is all about streaming. It’s a Wi-Fi Alliance spec recently demoed at CES 2013 that’s designed to stream video and photos from smartphones, tablets, and future embedded devices. Like Apple’s AirPlay, it moves stuff from a small screen onto a big TV screen. It’s based upon Wi-Fi’s not-new-but-rarely-used Wi-Fi Direct standard (WiDi 3.5) that avoids routers to establish peer-to-peer connectivity.

The Wi-Fi Alliance Miracast standard streams video from small to large screens, as shown in this excerpt from a YouTube video. (Courtesy of YouTube and Wi-Fi Alliance.)

The Wi-Fi Alliance Miracast standard streams video from small to large screens, as shown in this excerpt from a YouTube video. (Courtesy of YouTube and Wi-Fi Alliance.)

Miracast supports 1080p HD video, 5.1 surround, and CPUs from nVidia, TI, Qualcomm, Marvell and others have announced plans to support it. Built into the spec is the ability to stream DRM and HDCP protected content using already established HDMI and DisplayPort style copy protection schemes. I guess they figure if you’ve got the rights to play it on your phone, might as well play it on your TV too.

Last Fall, Google updated Android Jelly Bean to 4.2 and included Miracast as part of the update, and I’m thrilled that my Nexus 7 tablet can now, in theory, stream content to my Samsung Smart TV. As Android proliferates throughout the embedded market, I can envision commercial applications where a user might do more than stream a video to another embedded device. Sharing the entire smartphone’s screen can be useful for PowerPoint presentations or demoing just about any Android app in existence. If it’s on the phone’s screen, it can get mirrored via Wi-Fi to another screen.

Will MirrorLink and Miracast Converge?
I doubt the two standards will merge. MirrorLink is exclusively aimed at IVI systems in cars, and the closely curated standard is intended to vet applications to assure safe operation in a vehicle. Miracast is similar in that it mirrors a smartphone’s screen, but there are no limitations on moving between screens, so Miracast is clearly the superset standard to a broader market.

Ironically, as the Car Connectivity Consortium looks to release MirrorLink Version 2.0, they’re examining Miracast as a way to provide an “alternative video link” for streaming H.264 1080p@30 FPS into the car cabin.

Why? For passenger entertainment. Think about minivans (shudder) and Suburbans loaded with kids.

Tizen OS for Smartphones – Intel’s Biggest Bet Yet

Tizen HTML5 from Intel and Linux Foundation to be used by Samsung handsets in 2013 mobile.

Figure 1: Intel and the Linux Foundation collaborated on Tizen, an open source HTML5-based platform for smartphones, IVI, and other embedded devices.

[Update on 27 February 2013: At the recent 2013 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Samsung demoed a development handset running Tizen. CNET editor Luke Westaway posted a video review of the device which showed snappy performance, Android-like features, but felt that the early version was "a bit rough around the edges". Still, to see Tizen running on actual consumer hardware gives it cred.  A larger review by CNET's Roger Cheng can be found here: http://cnet.co/15R8xs3 ]

[8 Jan 2013 Update: Added "Disclosure" below and fixed some typos.]

Disclosure: As of 8 Jan 2013, I became a paid blogger for Intel’s ‘Roving Reporter’ embedded Intelligent Systems Alliance (edc.intel.com). But my opinion here is my own, and I call it like I see it.

Samsung hedges Apple, Google bets with Intel’s HTML5-based Tizen

Just when you thought the smartphone OS market was down to a choice between iOS and Android, Intel-backed Tizen jumps into the fray (Figure 1).  Tizen is Intel’s next kick at the can for mobile, and it’s joining several OS wannabes:  Microsoft Windows Phone 8, RIM Blackberry’s whatever-they’re-going-to-announce on 31 January 2013, and eventually Ubuntu phone platform.

Figure 2: On 3 January 2013 Ubuntu announced a plan to offer a smartphone OS. Key feature: use the phone as a computing platform and even drive a desktop monitor.

Samsung  Prepares to “Date” Other Partners

Samsung Electronics announced on 3 January that it will start selling smartphones sometime this year using Tizen as the OS platform. Samsung’s spokesperson didn’t elaborate on timing or models, but said in an emailed statement ”We plan to release new, competitive Tizen devices…and keep expanding the lineup.”

Tizen is the third incarnation of Intel’s attempts at building an embedded ecosystem which included MeeGo and Moblin. Tizen, in collaboration with The Linux Foundation, was announced mid-2011 and has been quietly gestating in the background and is now on Release 2.0. One of the largest supporters of Tizen is Samsung, so the recent announcement is no surprise.

Samsung no doubt seeks a back-up plan as Google’s Android OS has flown past Apple’s iOS as the predominant operating system for mobile devices  plus tablets (75%; Figure 3).

Figure 3: Android is now the predominant smartphone OS in 2012, according to IDC. (Source: IDC; http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS23818212 ).

As Samsung is now the world’s largest smartphone supplier (Figure 4), the company might be following a play from Apple in seeking to control more of its own destiny through Tizen.

Figure 4: IC Insights – and most other analyst firms – rank Samsung as the world’s largest smartphone supplier. This data is from 28 November 2012.(Source: IC Insights; http://www.icinsights.com/news/bulletins/Samsung-And-Apple-Set-To-Dominate-2012-Smartphone-Market/)

And with Samsung and Apple’s patent dispute nastiness, along with rumblings over whether Samsung may or may not continue to supply processors for iPhones, Tizen represents one more way for Samsung to control their own destiny separate from Google and Apple.

Intel’s Mobile Imperative Needs HTML5

Intel, on the other hand, desperately needs more wins in the mobile space.  Last year I blogged how the company gained some traction by announcing several Atom (Medfield) SoC-based handset wins,  but the company has gone on record stating their real goal is to be inside mobile devices from Apple, Samsung or both. In fact, it’s a bet-the-farm play for Intel and it most likely pushed Intel CEO Paul Otellini into his future retirement plans.

The general embedded market is closely following what happens in mobile, adopting low-power ARM SoCs and Atom CPUs, using wireless Wi-Fi and NFC radios for M2M nodes, and deploying Android for both headed and headless systems such as POS and digital signage. If Tizen moves the needle in smartphones for Samsung, chances are it’ll be used by other players. With HTML5, it will be straightforward to port applications and data across hardware platforms – a goal that Intel’s EVP Renee James  touted at 2012′s Intel Developers Forum (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Intel’s Renee James is betting on HTML5 in Tizen to kickstart transparent computing. (Image taken by author at IDF 2012.)

 

Tizen is based upon HTML5 with plans to achieve the old Java “write once, run anywhere” promise.   For Intel, the Tizen SDK and API means that applications written for the most popular mobile processors – such as Qualcomm’s Snapdragon or nVidia’s Tegra 3 – could easily run on Intel processors. In fact, at IDF Intel posited a demo of a user’s application running first on a home PC, then a smart phone, then a connected in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system, and then finally on an office platform. Intel’s Renee James explained that it matters not what underlying hardware runs the application – HTML5 allows seamless migration across any and all devices.

Tizen Stakes for Intel and Samsung

This pretty much sums up the Tizen vision, both for Intel and for Samsung. Tizen means freedom, as it abstracts the hardware from any application.

If successful, Tizen opens up processor sockets to Intel as mobile vendors swap CPUs. Tizen also allows Samsung to choose any processor, while relying on open source and open standards-based code supported by The Linux Foundation.