AMD on a Design Win Roll: GE and Samsung, Recent Examples

AMD is announcing several design wins per week as second-gen APUs show promise.

Note: AMD is a sponsor of this blog.

I follow many companies on Twitter, but lately it’s AMD that’s tweeting the loudest with weekly design wins. The company’s APUs—accelerated processing units—seem to be gaining traction in systems where PC functionality with game-like  graphics is critical. Core to both of these—pun intended!—is the x86 ISA with its PC compatibility and rich software ecosystem.

Here’s a look at two of AMD’s recent design wins, one for an R-Series and the other for the all-in-one G-Series APU.

Samsung’s “set-back box” adds high-res graphics and PC functions to their digital signage displays. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung’s “set-back box” adds high-res graphics and PC functions to their digital signage displays. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung Digital Signs on to AMD

In April Samsung and AMD announced that AMD’s second-gen embedded R-Series APU, previously codenamed “Bald Eagle” is powering Samsung’s latest set-back box (SBB) digital media players. I had no idea what a set-back box is until I looked it up.

Turns out it’s a slim embedded “pizza box” computer 310mm x 219mm x 32mm (12.2in x 8.6in x 1.3in) that’s inserted into the back (“set-back”) of a Samsung Large Format Display (LFD). These industrial-grade LFDs range in size from 32in to 82in and are used in digital signage applications.

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD R-Series APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD R-Series APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

What makes them so compelling is the reason they chose AMD’s R-Series APU. The SBB is a complete networked PC, alleviating the need for a separate box; they’re remotely controlled by Samsung’s MagicInfo software that allows up to 192 displays to be linked with same- or stitched-display information.

That is, one can build a video wall where the image is split across the displays—relying on AMD’s EyeFinity graphics feature—or content can be streamed across networked displays depending upon the retailer’s desired effect. Key to Samsung’s selling differentiation is remote management, RS232 control, and network-based self-diagnostics and active alert notification of problems.

Samsung is using the RX-425BB APU with integrated AMD Radeon R6 GPU. Per the datasheet, this version has a 35W TDP, 4 x86 cores and 6 GPU cores @ 654 MHz, is based on AMD’s latest “Steamroller” 64-bit CPU and Embedded Radeon E8860 discrete GPU. Each R-Series APU can drive four 3D, 4K, or HD displays (up to 4096 x 2160 pixels) while running DirectX 11.1, OpenGL 2.4 and AMD’s Mantle gaming SDK.

As neat as all of this is—it’s a super high-end embedded LAN-party “gaming” PC system, afterall—it’s the support for the latest HSA Foundation specs that makes the R-Series (and companion G-Series SOC) equally compelling for deeply embedded applications.  HSA allows mixed CPU and GPU computation which is especially useful in industrial control with its combination of general purpose, machine control, and display requirements.

GE Chooses AMD SOC for SFF

The second design win for AMD was back in February and it wasn’t broadcast widely: I stumbled across it while working on a sponsored piece for GE Intelligent Platforms (Disclosure: GE-IP is a sponsor of this blog.)

The AMD G-Series is now a monolithic, single-chip SOC that combines x86 CPU and Radeon graphics. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

The AMD G-Series is now a monolithic, single-chip SOC that combines x86 CPU and Radeon graphics. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

Used in a rugged, COM Express industrial controller, the AMD G-Series SOC met GE’s needs for low power and all-in-one processing, said Tommy Swigart, Global Product Manager at GE Intelligent Platforms. The “Jaguar” core in the SOC can sip as little as 5W TDP, yet still offers 3x PCIe, 2x GigE, 4x serial, plus HD audio and video, 10 USB (including 2x USB 3.0) and 2 SATA interfaces. What a Swiss Army knife of capability it is.

GE chose AMD’s G-Series APU for a rugged COM Express module for use in GE’s Industrial Internet. (Courtesy: GE Intelligent Platforms, YouTube.)

GE chose AMD’s G-Series APU for a rugged COM Express module for use in GE’s Industrial Internet. (Courtesy: GE Intelligent Platforms, YouTube.)

GE’s going all-in with the GE Industrial Internet, the company’s version of the IoT. Since the company is so diversified, GE can wring cost efficiencies for its customers by predicting aircraft maintenance, reducing energy in office HVAC installations, and interconnecting telemetry from locomotives to reduce track traffic and downtime. AMD’s G-Series APU brings computation, graphics, and bundles of I/O in a single-chip SOC—ideal for use in GE’s rugged SFF.

GE’s Industrial Internet runs on AMD’s G-Series APU. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

GE’s Industrial Internet runs on AMD’s G-Series APU. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

 

SMARC: ARM’d for a Power Play

ARM is migrating into the embedded board market, at the expense of x86 designs.

ARM is migrating into the embedded board market, at the expense of x86 designs.

In the world of multicore, it’s hard to get more cores than the quads now shipping in the latest smartphones, most of which are based upon ARM. But what about the board-level embedded market that I follow more closely?

You know it’s a foregone conclusion that ARM’s going to win the low power wars here too when even the x86 PC/104 vendors start musing about the need for ARM roadmaps.

 

WinSystems VP Bob Burckle spins a PC/104 board. The company is considering adding ARM processors to its predominantly x86-based boards.

WinSystems VP Bob Burckle spins a PC/104 board. The company is considering adding ARM processors to its predominantly x86-based boards.

In my discussion with WinSystems–a company that helps drive usually Intel-focused x86 trade consortia–Bob Burckle ponders an open standard form factor for ARM-based single board computers.  .

I’ve come to learn that ADLINK, Congatec, Kontron and others have pushed the very concept of ARM-based SBCs through the Standardization Group for Embedded Technologies (SGET) in a computer-on-module (COM) standard they’re calling Smart Mobility ARChitecture SMARC version 1.0.

Smart Mobility Architecture (SMARC) is a COM processor module ideally suited for ARM processors.

Smart Mobility Architecture (SMARC) is a COM processor module ideally suited for ARM processors. (Courtesy: Standardization Group for Embedded Technologies, SGET.org.)

It comes in 82mm x 50mm and 82mm x 80mm flavors, and Kontron is already implementing it for aircraft passenger In-Flight Entertainment systems.Figure 2 Kontron IFE plane cut-away

Look for ARM processors on PC/104, VME, COM Express…and SMARC boards soon. Choices will be from Texas Instruments, Atmel, Qualcomm, NVIDIA, Xilinx, and even AMD (which licensed the ARM for security engines in its APUs).

Kontron SMARC-sAT30 is a low profile platform based SMARC specification and integrates the 1.2 GHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core ARM processor (Cortex A9).

Kontron SMARC-sAT30 is a low profile platform based SMARC specification and integrates the 1.2 GHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core ARM processor (Cortex A9).