AMD Targets Embedded Graphics

As the PC market flounders, AMD continues focus on embedded, this time with three (3) new GPU families.

The widescreen LCD digital sign at my doctor’s office tells me today’s date, that it’s flu season, and that various health maintenance clinics are available if only I’d sign up. I feel guilty every time.

An electronic digital sign, mostly text based. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons.)

An electronic digital sign, mostly text based. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons.)

These kind of static, text-only displays are not the kind of digital sign that GPU powerhouses like AMD are targeting. Microsoft Windows-based text running in an endless loop requires no graphics or imaging horsepower at all.

Instead, high performance is captured in those Minority Report multimedia messages that move with you across multiple screens down a hallway; the immersive Vegas-style electronic gaming machines that attract senior citizens like moths to a flame; and the portable ultrasound machine that gives a nervous mother the first images of her baby in HD. These are the kinds of embedded systems that need high-performance graphics, imaging, and encode/decode hardware.

AMD announced three new embedded graphics families, spanning low power (4 displays) ranging up to 6 displays and 1.5 TFLOPs of number crunching for high-end GPU graphics processing.

AMD announced three new embedded graphics families, spanning low power (4 displays) ranging up to 6 displays and 1.5 TFLOPs of number crunching for high-end GPU graphics processing.

Advanced Micro Devices wants you to think of their GPUs for your next embedded system.

AMD just announced a collection of three new embedded graphics processor families using 28nm process technology designed to span the gamut from multi-display and low power all the way up to a near doubling of performance at the high end.  Within each new family, AMD is looking to differentiate from the competition at both the chip- and module/board-level. Competition comes mostly from Nvidia discrete GPUs, although some Intel processors and ARM-based SoCs cross paths with AMD. As well, AMD is pushing its roadmap quickly away from previous generation 40nm GPU devices.

Comparison between AMD 40nm and 28nm embedded GPUs.

Comparison between AMD 40nm and 28nm embedded GPUs.

A Word about Form Factors

Sure, AMD’s got PC-card plug-in boards in PCI Express format—long ones, short ones, and ones with big honking heat sinks and fans and plenty of I/O connections. AMD’s high-end embedded GPUs like the new E8870 Series are available on PCIe and boast up to 1500 GFLOPs (single precision) and 12 Compute Units. They’ll drive up to 6 displays and burn up to 75W of power without an on-board fan, yet since they’re on AMD’s embedded roadmap—they’ll be around for 5 years.

An MXM (Mobile PCIe Module) format PCB containing AMD’s mid-grade E8950 GPU.

An MXM (Mobile PCIe Module) format PCB containing AMD’s mid-grade E8950 GPU.

Compared to AMD’s previous embedded E8860 Series, the E8870 has 97% more 3DMark 11 performance when running from 4GB of onboard memory. Interestingly, besides the PCIe version—which might only be considered truly “embedded” when plugged into a panel PC or thin client machine—AMD also supports the MXM format.  The E8870 will be available on the Type B Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) that’s a mere 82mm x 105mm and complete with memory, GPU, and ancillary ICs.

Middle of the Road

For more of a true embedded experience, AMD’s E8950MXM still drives 6 displays and works with AMD’s EyeFinity capability of stitching multiple displays together in Jumbotron fashion. Yet the 3000 GFLOPs (yes, that’s 3000 GFLOPs peak, single precision) little guy still has 32 Compute Units, 8 GB of GPU memory, and is optimized for 4K (UHD) code/decoding. If embedded 4K displays are your thing, this is the GPU you need.

Hardly middle of the road, right? Depending upon the SKU, this family can burn up to 95W and is available exclusively on one of those MXM modules described above. In embedded version, the E8950 is available for 3 years (oddly, two fewer than the others).

Low Power, No Compromises

Yet not every immersive digital sign, MRI machine, or arcade console needs balls-to-the-wall graphics rendering and 6 displays. For this reason, AMD’s E6465 series focuses on low power and small form factor (SFF) footprint. Able to drive 4 displays and having a humble 2 Compute Units, the series still boasts 192 GFLOPs (single precision), 2 GB of GPU memory, 5 years of embedded life, but consumes a mere 20W.

The E6465 is available in PCIe, MXM (the smaller Type A size at 82mm x 70mm), and a multichip module. The MCM format really looks embedded, with the GPU and memory all soldered on the same MCM substrate for easier design-in onto SFFs and other board-level systems.

More Than Meets the Eye

While AMD is announcing three new embedded GPU families, it’s easy to think the story stops with the GPU itself. It doesn’t. AMD doesn’t get nearly enough recognition for the suite of graphics, imaging, and heterogeneous processing software available for these devices.

For example, in mil/aero avionics systems AMD has a few design wins in glass cockpits such as with Airbus. Some legacy mil displays don’t always follow standard refresh timing, so the new embedded GPU products support custom timing parameters. Clocks like Timing Standard, Front Porch, Refresh Rate and even Pixel Clocks are programmable—ideal for the occasional non-standard military glass cockpit.

AMD is also a strong supporter of OpenCL and OpenGL—programming and graphics languages that ease programmers’ coding efforts. They also lend themselves to creating DO-254 (hardware) and DO-178C (software) certifiable systems, such as those found in Airbus military airframes. Airbus Defence has selected AMD graphics processors for next-gen avionics displays.

Avionics glass cockpits, like this one from Airbus, are prime targets for high-end embedded graphics. AMD has a design win in one of Airbus' systems.

Avionics glass cockpits, like this one from Airbus, are prime targets for high-end embedded graphics. AMD has a design win in one of Airbus’ systems.

Finally, AMD is the founding member of the HSA Foundation, an organization that has released heterogeneous system standard (HSA) version 1.0, also designed to make programmers’ jobs way easier when using multiple dissimilar “compute engines” in the same system. Companies like ARM, Imagination, MediaTek and others are HSA Foundation supporters.

 

 

A Sign of the Times

AMD’s FirePro series lights up Godzilla-sized Times Square digital sign.

[Editor's note: blog updated 8-18-15 to remove "Radeon" and make other corrections.]

They say the lights are bright on Broadway, and they ain’t kidding.  A new AMD-powered digital sign makes a stadium Jumbotron look small.

I’ve done a few LAN parties and appreciate an immersive, high-res graphics experience. But nothing could have prepared me for the whopping 25,000 square feet of graphics in Times Square powered by AMD’s FirePro series (1535 Broadway, between 45th and 46th Streets).

The UltraHD media wall is the ultimate digital sign, comprising the equivalent of about 24 million RGB LED pixels. The media wall is a full city block long by 8 stories high! Designed and managed by Diversified Media Group, the sign is thought to be the largest of its kind in the world, and certainly the largest in the U.S.

AMD-powered digital sign will soon grace Times Square, boasting America's largest digital sign.

Three AMD FirePro UltraHD graphics cards drive the largest digital sign in the world.
This view of Times Square shows the commercial importance of high-res digital signs. [1 Times Square night 2013, by Chensiyuan; Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons.]

The combined 10,048 x 2,368 pixel “display” is powered by a mere three AMD FirePro graphics cards. Each card drives six sections of the overall display wall. The whole UHD experience is so realistic because of AMD’s Graphics Core Next architecture that executes billions of operations in parallel per cycle.

The Diversified Media Group’s Times Square digital sign is powered by AMD FirePro graphics, shown here under construction. [Courtesy: Diversified Media Group.]

The Diversified Media Group’s Times Square digital sign is powered by AMD FirePro graphics, shown here under construction. [Courtesy: Diversified Media Group.]

AMD’s well-proven EyeFinity capability sends partitioned images to various display zones (up to six), all coordinated across the three graphics cards using the FirePro S400 synchronization module.

The FirePro graphics family was introduced at NAB2014 specifically for high-res, media intensive applications like this. There’s 16 GB of GDDR5 memory, PCIe 3.0 for high-speed IO, and the 28nm process technology used in the Graphics  Core Next architecture balances 3D rendering with GPGPU computation. It all adds up to the performance needed for the Times Square “mombo-tron” skyscraper display.

Only three AMD’s W600 FirePro graphics cards like these power America’s largest digital sign in Times Square.

Only three AMD’s W600 FirePro graphics cards like these power America’s largest digital sign in Times Square.

According to the New York Times, approximately 300,000 people each day will see the sign, advertising that might sell for as much as $2.5 million for four weeks–certainly some pretty expensive real estate, even for NYC. So the sign must look astounding and work flawlessly.

This blog was sponsored by AMD.