AMD Targets Embedded Graphics

As the PC market flounders, AMD continues focus on embedded, this time with three (3) new GPU families.

The widescreen LCD digital sign at my doctor’s office tells me today’s date, that it’s flu season, and that various health maintenance clinics are available if only I’d sign up. I feel guilty every time.

An electronic digital sign, mostly text based. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons.)

An electronic digital sign, mostly text based. (Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons.)

These kind of static, text-only displays are not the kind of digital sign that GPU powerhouses like AMD are targeting. Microsoft Windows-based text running in an endless loop requires no graphics or imaging horsepower at all.

Instead, high performance is captured in those Minority Report multimedia messages that move with you across multiple screens down a hallway; the immersive Vegas-style electronic gaming machines that attract senior citizens like moths to a flame; and the portable ultrasound machine that gives a nervous mother the first images of her baby in HD. These are the kinds of embedded systems that need high-performance graphics, imaging, and encode/decode hardware.

AMD announced three new embedded graphics families, spanning low power (4 displays) ranging up to 6 displays and 1.5 TFLOPs of number crunching for high-end GPU graphics processing.

AMD announced three new embedded graphics families, spanning low power (4 displays) ranging up to 6 displays and 1.5 TFLOPs of number crunching for high-end GPU graphics processing.

Advanced Micro Devices wants you to think of their GPUs for your next embedded system.

AMD just announced a collection of three new embedded graphics processor families using 28nm process technology designed to span the gamut from multi-display and low power all the way up to a near doubling of performance at the high end.  Within each new family, AMD is looking to differentiate from the competition at both the chip- and module/board-level. Competition comes mostly from Nvidia discrete GPUs, although some Intel processors and ARM-based SoCs cross paths with AMD. As well, AMD is pushing its roadmap quickly away from previous generation 40nm GPU devices.

Comparison between AMD 40nm and 28nm embedded GPUs.

Comparison between AMD 40nm and 28nm embedded GPUs.

A Word about Form Factors

Sure, AMD’s got PC-card plug-in boards in PCI Express format—long ones, short ones, and ones with big honking heat sinks and fans and plenty of I/O connections. AMD’s high-end embedded GPUs like the new E8870 Series are available on PCIe and boast up to 1500 GFLOPs (single precision) and 12 Compute Units. They’ll drive up to 6 displays and burn up to 75W of power without an on-board fan, yet since they’re on AMD’s embedded roadmap—they’ll be around for 5 years.

An MXM (Mobile PCIe Module) format PCB containing AMD’s mid-grade E8950 GPU.

An MXM (Mobile PCIe Module) format PCB containing AMD’s mid-grade E8950 GPU.

Compared to AMD’s previous embedded E8860 Series, the E8870 has 97% more 3DMark 11 performance when running from 4GB of onboard memory. Interestingly, besides the PCIe version—which might only be considered truly “embedded” when plugged into a panel PC or thin client machine—AMD also supports the MXM format.  The E8870 will be available on the Type B Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) that’s a mere 82mm x 105mm and complete with memory, GPU, and ancillary ICs.

Middle of the Road

For more of a true embedded experience, AMD’s E8950MXM still drives 6 displays and works with AMD’s EyeFinity capability of stitching multiple displays together in Jumbotron fashion. Yet the 3000 GFLOPs (yes, that’s 3000 GFLOPs peak, single precision) little guy still has 32 Compute Units, 8 GB of GPU memory, and is optimized for 4K (UHD) code/decoding. If embedded 4K displays are your thing, this is the GPU you need.

Hardly middle of the road, right? Depending upon the SKU, this family can burn up to 95W and is available exclusively on one of those MXM modules described above. In embedded version, the E8950 is available for 3 years (oddly, two fewer than the others).

Low Power, No Compromises

Yet not every immersive digital sign, MRI machine, or arcade console needs balls-to-the-wall graphics rendering and 6 displays. For this reason, AMD’s E6465 series focuses on low power and small form factor (SFF) footprint. Able to drive 4 displays and having a humble 2 Compute Units, the series still boasts 192 GFLOPs (single precision), 2 GB of GPU memory, 5 years of embedded life, but consumes a mere 20W.

The E6465 is available in PCIe, MXM (the smaller Type A size at 82mm x 70mm), and a multichip module. The MCM format really looks embedded, with the GPU and memory all soldered on the same MCM substrate for easier design-in onto SFFs and other board-level systems.

More Than Meets the Eye

While AMD is announcing three new embedded GPU families, it’s easy to think the story stops with the GPU itself. It doesn’t. AMD doesn’t get nearly enough recognition for the suite of graphics, imaging, and heterogeneous processing software available for these devices.

For example, in mil/aero avionics systems AMD has a few design wins in glass cockpits such as with Airbus. Some legacy mil displays don’t always follow standard refresh timing, so the new embedded GPU products support custom timing parameters. Clocks like Timing Standard, Front Porch, Refresh Rate and even Pixel Clocks are programmable—ideal for the occasional non-standard military glass cockpit.

AMD is also a strong supporter of OpenCL and OpenGL—programming and graphics languages that ease programmers’ coding efforts. They also lend themselves to creating DO-254 (hardware) and DO-178C (software) certifiable systems, such as those found in Airbus military airframes. Airbus Defence has selected AMD graphics processors for next-gen avionics displays.

Avionics glass cockpits, like this one from Airbus, are prime targets for high-end embedded graphics. AMD has a design win in one of Airbus' systems.

Avionics glass cockpits, like this one from Airbus, are prime targets for high-end embedded graphics. AMD has a design win in one of Airbus’ systems.

Finally, AMD is the founding member of the HSA Foundation, an organization that has released heterogeneous system standard (HSA) version 1.0, also designed to make programmers’ jobs way easier when using multiple dissimilar “compute engines” in the same system. Companies like ARM, Imagination, MediaTek and others are HSA Foundation supporters.

 

 

A Sign of the Times

AMD’s FirePro series lights up Godzilla-sized Times Square digital sign.

[Editor's note: blog updated 8-18-15 to remove "Radeon" and make other corrections.]

They say the lights are bright on Broadway, and they ain’t kidding.  A new AMD-powered digital sign makes a stadium Jumbotron look small.

I’ve done a few LAN parties and appreciate an immersive, high-res graphics experience. But nothing could have prepared me for the whopping 25,000 square feet of graphics in Times Square powered by AMD’s FirePro series (1535 Broadway, between 45th and 46th Streets).

The UltraHD media wall is the ultimate digital sign, comprising the equivalent of about 24 million RGB LED pixels. The media wall is a full city block long by 8 stories high! Designed and managed by Diversified Media Group, the sign is thought to be the largest of its kind in the world, and certainly the largest in the U.S.

AMD-powered digital sign will soon grace Times Square, boasting America's largest digital sign.

Three AMD FirePro UltraHD graphics cards drive the largest digital sign in the world.
This view of Times Square shows the commercial importance of high-res digital signs. [1 Times Square night 2013, by Chensiyuan; Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons.]

The combined 10,048 x 2,368 pixel “display” is powered by a mere three AMD FirePro graphics cards. Each card drives six sections of the overall display wall. The whole UHD experience is so realistic because of AMD’s Graphics Core Next architecture that executes billions of operations in parallel per cycle.

The Diversified Media Group’s Times Square digital sign is powered by AMD FirePro graphics, shown here under construction. [Courtesy: Diversified Media Group.]

The Diversified Media Group’s Times Square digital sign is powered by AMD FirePro graphics, shown here under construction. [Courtesy: Diversified Media Group.]

AMD’s well-proven EyeFinity capability sends partitioned images to various display zones (up to six), all coordinated across the three graphics cards using the FirePro S400 synchronization module.

The FirePro graphics family was introduced at NAB2014 specifically for high-res, media intensive applications like this. There’s 16 GB of GDDR5 memory, PCIe 3.0 for high-speed IO, and the 28nm process technology used in the Graphics  Core Next architecture balances 3D rendering with GPGPU computation. It all adds up to the performance needed for the Times Square “mombo-tron” skyscraper display.

Only three AMD’s W600 FirePro graphics cards like these power America’s largest digital sign in Times Square.

Only three AMD’s W600 FirePro graphics cards like these power America’s largest digital sign in Times Square.

According to the New York Times, approximately 300,000 people each day will see the sign, advertising that might sell for as much as $2.5 million for four weeks–certainly some pretty expensive real estate, even for NYC. So the sign must look astounding and work flawlessly.

This blog was sponsored by AMD.

 

Move Over Arduino, AMD and GizmoSphere Have a “Jump” On You with Graphics

The UK’s National Videogame Arcade relies on CPU, graphics, I/O and openness to power interactive exhibits.

Editor’s note: This blog is sponsored by AMD.

When I was a kid I was constantly fascinated with how things worked. What happens when I stick this screwdriver in the wall socket? (Really.) How come the dinner plate falls down and not up?

Humans have to try things for ourselves in order to fully understand them; this sparks our creativity and for many of us becomes a life calling.

Attempting to catalyze visitors’ curiosity, the UK’s National Videogame Arcade (NVA) opened in March 2015 with the sole intention of getting children and adults interested in videogames through the use of interactive exhibits, most of which are hands-on. The hope is that young people will first be stimulated by the games, and secondly that they someday unleash their creativity on the videogame and tech industries.

The UK's National Videogame Arcade promotes gaming through hands-on exhibits powered by GizmoSphere embedded hardware.

The UK’s National Videogame Arcade promotes gaming through hands-on exhibits powered by GizmoSphere embedded hardware.

 Might As Well “Jump!”

The NVA is located in a corner building with lots of curbside windows—imagine a fancy New York City department store but without the mannequins in the street-side windows. Spread across five floors and a total of 33,000 square feet, the place is a cooperative effort between GameCity (a nice bunch of gamers), the Nottingham City Council, and local Nottingham Trent University.

The goal of pulling in 60,000 visitors a year is partly achieved by the NVA’s signature exhibit “Jump!” that allows visitors to experience gravity (without the plate) and how it affects videogame characters like those in Donkey Kong or Angry Birds. Visitors actually get to jump on the Jump-o-tron, a physics-based sensor that’s controlled by GizmoSphere’s Gizmo 2 development board.

The Jumpotron uses AMD's G-Series SoC combining an x86 and Radeon GPU.

The Jumpotron uses AMD’s G-Series SoC combining an x86 and Radeon GPU.

The heart of Gizmo 2 is AMD’s G-Series APU, combining a 64-bit x86 CPU and Radeon graphics processor. Gizmo 2 is the latest creation from the GizmoSphere nonprofit open source community which seeks to “bring the power of a supercomputer and the I/O capabilities of a microcontroller to the x86 open source community,” according to www.gizmosphere.org.

The open source Gizmo 2 runs Windows and Linux, bridging PC games to the embedded world.

The open source Gizmo 2 runs Windows and Linux, bridging PC games to the embedded world.

Jump!” allows visitors to experience—and tweak—gravity while examining the effect upon on-screen characters. The combination requires extensive processing—up to 85 GFLOPS worth—plus video manipulation and display. What’s amazing is that “Jump!”, along with many other NVA exhibits, isn’t powered by rackmount servers but rather by the tiny 4 x 4 inch Gizmo 2 that supports Direct X 11.1, OpenGL 4.2x, and OpenCL 1.2. It also runs Windows and Linux.

AMD’s “G” Powers Gizmo 2

Gizmo 2 is a dense little package, sporting HDMI, Ethernet, PCIe, USB (2.0 and 3.0), plus myriad other A/V and I/O such as A/D/A—all of them essential for NVA exhibits like “Jump!” Says Ian Simons of the NVA, “Gizmo 2 is used in many of our games…and there are plans for even more games embedded into the building,” including furniture and even street-facing window displays.

Gizmo 2’s small size and support for open source software and hardware—plus the ability to develop on the gamer’s Unity engine—makes Gizmo 2 the preferred choice. Yet the market contains ample platforms from which to choose. Arduino comes to mind.

Gizmo 2's schematic.

Gizmo 2′s schematic. The x86 G-Series SoC is loaded with I/O.

Compared to Arduino, the AMD G Series SoC (GX-210HA) powering Gizmo 2 is orders of magnitude more powerful, plus it’s x86 based and running at 1.0GHz (the integral GPU runs at 300 MHz). This makes the world’s cache of Intel-oriented, Windows-based software and drivers available to Gizmo 2—including some server-side programs. “NVA can create projects with Gizmo 2, including 3D graphics and full motion video, with plenty of horsepower,” says Simons. He’s referring to some big projects already installed at the NVA, plus others in the planning stages.

“One of things we’d like to do,” Simons says, “is continue to integrate Gizmo 2 into more of the building to create additional interactive exhibits and displays.” The small size of Gizmo 2, plus the wickedly awesome performance/graphics rendering/size/Watt of the AMD G-Series APU, allows Gizmo 2 to be embedded all over the building.

See Me, Feel Me

With a nod to The Who’s (1) rock opera Tommy, the NVA building will soon have more Gizmo 2 modules wired into the infrastructure, mixing images and sound. There are at least three projects in the concept stage:

  • DMX addressable logic in the central stairway.  With exposed cables and beams, visitors would be able to control the audio, video, and possibly LED lighting of the stairwell area using a series of switches. The author wonders if voice or other tactile feedback would create all manner of immersive “psychedelic” A/V in the stairwell central hall.
  • Controllable audio zones in the rooftop garden. The NVA’s Yamaha-based sound system already includes 40 zones. Adding AMD G-Series horsepower to these zones would allow visitors to create individually customized light/sound shows, possibly around botanical themes. Has there ever been a Little Shop of Horrors videogame where the plants eat the gardener? I wonder.
  • Sidewalk animation that uses all those street-facing windows to animate the building, possibly changing the building’s façade (Star Trek cloak, anyone?) or even individually controlling games inside the building from outside (or presenting inside activities to the outside). Either way, all those windows, future LCDs, and reams of I/O will require lots more Gizmo 2 embedded boards.

The Gizmo 2 costs $199 and is available from several retailers such as Element14. With Gerber schematics and all the board-focused software open source, it’s no wonder this x86 embedded board is attractive to gamers. With AMD’s G-Series APU onboard, the all-in-one HDK/SDK is an ideal choice for embedded designs—and those future gamers playing with the Gizmo 2 at the UK’s NVA.

BTW: The Who harkened from London, not Nottingham.

Virtual, Immersive, Interactive: Performance Graphics and Processing for IoT Displays

Vending machines outside Walmart

Current-gen machines like these will give way to smart, IoT connected machines with 64-bit graphics and virtual reality-like customer interaction.

Not every IoT node contains a low-performance processor, sensor and slow comms link. Sure, there may be tens of billions of these, but estimates by IHS, Gartner, Cisco still infer the need for billions of smart IoT nodes with hefty processing needs. These intelligent IoT platforms are best left to 64-bit algorithm processors like AMD’s G-and R-Series of Accelerated Processing Units (APU). AMD’s claim to fame is 64-bit cores combined with on-board Radeon graphics processing units (GPU) and tons of I/O.

As an example, consider this year’s smart vending machine. It may dispense espresso or electronic toys, or maybe show the customer wearing virtual custom-fit clothing. Suppose the machine showed you–at that very moment–using or drinking the product in the machine you were just starting at seconds before.

Far fetched? Far from it. It’s real.

These machines require a multi-media, sensor fusion experience. Multiple iPad-like touch screens may present high-def product options while cameras track customers’ eye movements, facial expressions, and body language in three-space.

This “visual compute” platform will tailor the display information to best interact with the customer in an immersive, gesture-sort of experience. Fusing all these inputs, processing the data in real-time, and driving multiple displays is best handled by 64-bit APUs with closely-coupled CPU and GPU execution units, hardware acceleration, and support for standards like DirectX 11, HSA 1.0, OpenGL and OpenCL.

For heavy lifting in visual compute-intensive IoT platforms, keep an eye on AMD’s graphics-ready APUs.

If you are attending Embedded World February 24-26, be sure to check out the keynote Heterogeneous Computing for an Internet of Things World,” by Scott Aylor, Corporate VP and General Manager, AMD Embedded Solutions on Wednesday the 25th at 9:30.

This blog was sponsored by AMD.

AMD’s Single Chip Embedded SoC: Upward and to the Right

Monolithic AMD embedded G Series SoCs combine x86 multicore, Radeon graphics, and a Southbridge. It’s one-stop-shopping, and it’s a flood targeting Intel again.

AMD arrow logoThe little arrow-like “a” AMD logo once represented an “upward and to right” growth strategy, back in the 1980s as the company was striving for $1.0B and I worked there just out of university.

In 2013, AMD is focusing on the embedded market with a vengeance and it’s “upward and to the right” again. The stated target is for AMD to grow embedded revenues from 5% in Q3 2012 to 20% of the total by Q4 2013. Wow. I’m excited about the company’s prospects, though I know they’ve had decades of false starts or technology successes that were later to sold off in favor of their personal war with Intel for PC dominance. (Flash memories and Vantis? The first DSP telephone modem Am7910? Telecom line cards? Alchemy “StrongMIPS”? All gone.)

Know what? PCs are in the tank right now, embedded is the market, and AMD might just be better positioned than Intel. They’re certainly saying all the right things. Take this week’s DESIGN West announcement of the new embedded G Series “SoCs”. Two years ago AMD invented the term Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) as a differentiated x86 CPU with an ATI GPU.

An AMD Accelerated Processing Unit merges a multicore x86 CPU with a Radeon GPU.

An AMD Accelerated Processing Unit merges a multicore x86 CPU with a Radeon GPU.

This week’s news is how the APU mind-melds with all of the traditional x86 Southbridge I/O to become a System-on-Chip (SoC).

The AMD G Series “SoC” does more real estate slight-of-hand by eliminating the Southbridge to bring all peripherals on-board the APU.

The AMD G Series “SoC” does more real estate slight-of-hand by eliminating the Southbridge to bring all peripherals on-board the APU.

The G Series SoCs meld AMD’s latest 28 nm quad-core “Jaguar” with the ATI Radeon 8000 series GPU and claim a 113 percent CPU and 20 percent GPU performance jump. More importantly, the single-chip SoC concept reduces footprint by 33 percent by eliminating a whole IC. On-board peripherals are HDMI/DVI/LVDS/VGA, PCIe, USB 2.0/3.0, SATA 2.x/3.x, SPI, SD card reader interface, and more. You know, the kind of stuff you’d expect in an all-in-one.

Available in 2- and 4-core flavors, the G Series SoC saves up to 33% board real estate, and even drives dual displays and high-res.

Available in 2- and 4-core flavors, the G Series SoC saves up to 33% board real estate, and even drives dual displays and high-res.

AMD is clearly setting their sites on embedded, and Intel is once again in the crosshairs. The company claims a 3x (218 percent) overall performance advantage with the GX-415GA SKU (quad core, 1.5 GHz, 2 MB L2) over Intel’s Atom D525 running Sandra Engineering 2011 Dhrystone ALU, Sandra Engineering 2011 Whetstone iSSE3, and other benchmarks such as those from EEMBC. Although AMD’s talking trash about the Atom, they’re disclosing all of their benchmarks, the hardware they were run on, and the OS assumptions. (The only thing that maybe seems hinky to me is that the respective motherboards use 4 GB DRAM (AMD) versus 1 GB DRAM (Intel).)

AMD CPU performance graph 1

And then there’s the built-in ECC which targets critical applications such as military, medical, financial, and casino gaming. The single-chip SoC is also designed ground-up to run -40 to +85C (operation) and will fit the bill in many rugged, defense, and medical applications requiring really good horsepower and graphics performance. Fan-less designs are the sweet spot with a 9W to 25W TDP, with all I/O’s blazing. Your mileage may vary, and AMD claims a much-better-than-Intel Performance-per-Watt number of 19 vs 9 as shown below. There are more family members to follow, some with sub 9W power consumption. Remember, that’s for CPU+GPU+Peripherals combined. Again, read the fine print.

AMD performance per Watt 1

I’m pretty enthused about AMD’s re-entry into the embedded market. Will Intel counter with something similar? Maybe not, but their own ultra low power Atom-based SoCs are winning smartphone designs left and right and have plenty of horsepower to run MPEG4 decode, DRM, and dual screen displays a la Apple’s AirPlay. So it’s game on, boys and girls.

The AMD vs Intel battle has always been good for the entire industry as it has “lifted all boats”. Here’s to a flood of new devices in embedded.