Quiz question: I’m an embedded system, but I’m not a smartphone. What am I?

In the embedded market, there are smartphones, automotive, consumer….and everything else. I’ve figured out why AMD’s G-Series SoCs fit perfectly into the “everything else”.

amd-embedded-solutions-g-series-logo-100xSince late 2013 AMD has been talking about their G-Series of Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) x86 devices that mix an Intel-compatible CPU with a discrete-class GPU and a whole pile of peripherals like USB, serial, VGA/DVI/HDMI and even ECC memory. The devices sounded pretty nifty—in either SoC flavor (“Steppe Eagle”) or without the GPU (“Crowned Eagle”). But it was a head-scratcher where they would fit. After-all, we’ve been conditioned by the smartphone market to think that any processor “SoC” that didn’t contain an ARM core wasn’t an SoC.

AMD’s Stephen Turnbull, Director of Marketing, Thin Client markets.

AMD’s Stephen Turnbull, Director of Marketing, Thin Client markets.

Yes, ARM dominates the smartphone market; no surprise there.

But there are plenty of other professional embedded markets that need CPU/GPU/peripherals where the value proposition is “Performance per dollar per Watt,” says AMD’s Stephen Turnbull, Director of Marketing, Thin Clients. In fact, AMD isn’t even targeting the smartphone market, according to General Manager Scott Aylor in his many presentations to analysts and the financial community.

AMD instead targets systems that need “visual compute”: which is any business-class embedded system that mixes computation with single- or multi-display capabilities at a “value price”. What this really means is: x86-class processing—and all the goodness associated with the Intel ecosystem—plus one or more LCDs. Even better if those LCDs are high-def, need 3D graphics or other fancy rendering, and if there’s industry-standard software being run such as OpenCL, OpenGL, or DirectX. AMD G-Series SoCs run from 6W up to 25W; the low end of this range is considered very power thrifty.

What AMD’s G-Series does best is cram an entire desktop motherboard and peripheral I/O, plus graphics card onto a single 28nm geometry SoC. Who needs this? Digital signs—where up to four LCDs make up the whole image—thin clients, casino gaming, avionics displays, point-of-sale terminals, network-attached-storage, security appliances, and oh so much more.

G-Series SoC on the top with peripheral IC for I/O on the bottom.

G-Series SoC on the top with peripheral IC for I/O on the bottom.

According to AMD’s Turnbull, the market for thin client computers is growing at 6 to 8 percent CAGR (per IDC), and “AMD commands over 50 percent share of market in thin clients.” Recent design wins with Samsung, HP and Fujitsu validate that using a G-Series SoC in the local box provides more-than-ample horsepower for data movement, encryption/decryption of central server data, and even local on-the-fly video encode/decode for Skype or multimedia streaming.

Typical use cases include government offices where all data is server-based, bank branch offices, and “even classroom learning environments, where learning labs standardize content, monitor students and centralize control of the STEM experience,” says AMD’s Turnbull.

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD R-Series APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

But what about other x86 processors in these spaces? I’m thinking about various SKUs from Intel such as their recent Celeron and Pentium M offerings (which are legacy names but based on modern versions of Ivy Bridge and Haswell architectures) and various Atom flavors in both dual- and quad-core colors. According to AMD’s  published literature, G-Series SoC’s outperform dual-core Atoms by 2x (multi-display) or 3x (overall performance) running industry-standard benchmarks for standard and graphics computation.

And then there’s that on-board GPU. If AMD’s Jaguar-based CPU core isn’t enough muscle, the system can load-balance (in performance and power) to move algorithm-heavy loads to the GPU for General Purpose GPU (GPGPU) number crunching. This is the basis for AMD’s efforts to bring the Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) spec to the world. Even companies like TI and ARM have jumped onto this one for their own heterogeneous processors.

G-Series: more software than hardware.

G-Series: more software than hardware.

In a nutshell, after two years of reading about (and writing about) AMD’s G-Series SoCs, I’m beginning to “get religion” that the market isn’t all about smartphone processors. Countless business-class embedded systems need Intel-compatible processing, multiple high-res displays, lots of I/O, myriad industry-standard software specs…and all for a price/Watt that doesn’t break the bank.

So the answer to the question posed in the title above is simply this: I’m a visually-oriented embedded system. And I’m everywhere.

This blog was sponsored by AMD.

 

 

AMD on a Design Win Roll: GE and Samsung, Recent Examples

AMD is announcing several design wins per week as second-gen APUs show promise.

Note: AMD is a sponsor of this blog.

I follow many companies on Twitter, but lately it’s AMD that’s tweeting the loudest with weekly design wins. The company’s APUs—accelerated processing units—seem to be gaining traction in systems where PC functionality with game-like  graphics is critical. Core to both of these—pun intended!—is the x86 ISA with its PC compatibility and rich software ecosystem.

Here’s a look at two of AMD’s recent design wins, one for an R-Series and the other for the all-in-one G-Series APU.

Samsung’s “set-back box” adds high-res graphics and PC functions to their digital signage displays. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung’s “set-back box” adds high-res graphics and PC functions to their digital signage displays. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung Digital Signs on to AMD

In April Samsung and AMD announced that AMD’s second-gen embedded R-Series APU, previously codenamed “Bald Eagle” is powering Samsung’s latest set-back box (SBB) digital media players. I had no idea what a set-back box is until I looked it up.

Turns out it’s a slim embedded “pizza box” computer 310mm x 219mm x 32mm (12.2in x 8.6in x 1.3in) that’s inserted into the back (“set-back”) of a Samsung Large Format Display (LFD). These industrial-grade LFDs range in size from 32in to 82in and are used in digital signage applications.

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD R-Series APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

Samsung LFDs (large format displays) use AMD R-Series APUs for flexible display features, like sending content to multiple displays via a network. (Courtesy: Samsung.)

What makes them so compelling is the reason they chose AMD’s R-Series APU. The SBB is a complete networked PC, alleviating the need for a separate box; they’re remotely controlled by Samsung’s MagicInfo software that allows up to 192 displays to be linked with same- or stitched-display information.

That is, one can build a video wall where the image is split across the displays—relying on AMD’s EyeFinity graphics feature—or content can be streamed across networked displays depending upon the retailer’s desired effect. Key to Samsung’s selling differentiation is remote management, RS232 control, and network-based self-diagnostics and active alert notification of problems.

Samsung is using the RX-425BB APU with integrated AMD Radeon R6 GPU. Per the datasheet, this version has a 35W TDP, 4 x86 cores and 6 GPU cores @ 654 MHz, is based on AMD’s latest “Steamroller” 64-bit CPU and Embedded Radeon E8860 discrete GPU. Each R-Series APU can drive four 3D, 4K, or HD displays (up to 4096 x 2160 pixels) while running DirectX 11.1, OpenGL 2.4 and AMD’s Mantle gaming SDK.

As neat as all of this is—it’s a super high-end embedded LAN-party “gaming” PC system, afterall—it’s the support for the latest HSA Foundation specs that makes the R-Series (and companion G-Series SOC) equally compelling for deeply embedded applications.  HSA allows mixed CPU and GPU computation which is especially useful in industrial control with its combination of general purpose, machine control, and display requirements.

GE Chooses AMD SOC for SFF

The second design win for AMD was back in February and it wasn’t broadcast widely: I stumbled across it while working on a sponsored piece for GE Intelligent Platforms (Disclosure: GE-IP is a sponsor of this blog.)

The AMD G-Series is now a monolithic, single-chip SOC that combines x86 CPU and Radeon graphics. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

The AMD G-Series is now a monolithic, single-chip SOC that combines x86 CPU and Radeon graphics. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

Used in a rugged, COM Express industrial controller, the AMD G-Series SOC met GE’s needs for low power and all-in-one processing, said Tommy Swigart, Global Product Manager at GE Intelligent Platforms. The “Jaguar” core in the SOC can sip as little as 5W TDP, yet still offers 3x PCIe, 2x GigE, 4x serial, plus HD audio and video, 10 USB (including 2x USB 3.0) and 2 SATA interfaces. What a Swiss Army knife of capability it is.

GE chose AMD’s G-Series APU for a rugged COM Express module for use in GE’s Industrial Internet. (Courtesy: GE Intelligent Platforms, YouTube.)

GE chose AMD’s G-Series APU for a rugged COM Express module for use in GE’s Industrial Internet. (Courtesy: GE Intelligent Platforms, YouTube.)

GE’s going all-in with the GE Industrial Internet, the company’s version of the IoT. Since the company is so diversified, GE can wring cost efficiencies for its customers by predicting aircraft maintenance, reducing energy in office HVAC installations, and interconnecting telemetry from locomotives to reduce track traffic and downtime. AMD’s G-Series APU brings computation, graphics, and bundles of I/O in a single-chip SOC—ideal for use in GE’s rugged SFF.

GE’s Industrial Internet runs on AMD’s G-Series APU. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

GE’s Industrial Internet runs on AMD’s G-Series APU. (Courtesy: GE; YouTube.)

 

Virtual, Immersive, Interactive: Performance Graphics and Processing for IoT Displays

Vending machines outside Walmart

Current-gen machines like these will give way to smart, IoT connected machines with 64-bit graphics and virtual reality-like customer interaction.

Not every IoT node contains a low-performance processor, sensor and slow comms link. Sure, there may be tens of billions of these, but estimates by IHS, Gartner, Cisco still infer the need for billions of smart IoT nodes with hefty processing needs. These intelligent IoT platforms are best left to 64-bit algorithm processors like AMD’s G-and R-Series of Accelerated Processing Units (APU). AMD’s claim to fame is 64-bit cores combined with on-board Radeon graphics processing units (GPU) and tons of I/O.

As an example, consider this year’s smart vending machine. It may dispense espresso or electronic toys, or maybe show the customer wearing virtual custom-fit clothing. Suppose the machine showed you–at that very moment–using or drinking the product in the machine you were just starting at seconds before.

Far fetched? Far from it. It’s real.

These machines require a multi-media, sensor fusion experience. Multiple iPad-like touch screens may present high-def product options while cameras track customers’ eye movements, facial expressions, and body language in three-space.

This “visual compute” platform will tailor the display information to best interact with the customer in an immersive, gesture-sort of experience. Fusing all these inputs, processing the data in real-time, and driving multiple displays is best handled by 64-bit APUs with closely-coupled CPU and GPU execution units, hardware acceleration, and support for standards like DirectX 11, HSA 1.0, OpenGL and OpenCL.

For heavy lifting in visual compute-intensive IoT platforms, keep an eye on AMD’s graphics-ready APUs.

If you are attending Embedded World February 24-26, be sure to check out the keynote Heterogeneous Computing for an Internet of Things World,” by Scott Aylor, Corporate VP and General Manager, AMD Embedded Solutions on Wednesday the 25th at 9:30.

This blog was sponsored by AMD.