CES Turns VPX Upside Down Using COM

Instead of putting I/O on a mezzanine, the processor is on the mezzanine and VPX is the I/O baseboard.

[ UPDATE: 19:00 hr 24 Apr 2015. Changed the interviewee's name to Wayne McGee, not Wayne Fisher. These gentlemen know each other, and Mr. McGee thankfully was polite about my misnomer. A thousand pardons! Also clarified that the ROCK-3x was previously announced. C. Ciufo ]

The computer-on-module (COM) approach puts the seldom-changing I/O on the base card and mounts the processor on a mezzanine board. The thinking is that processors change every few years (faster, more memory, from Intel to AMD to ARM, for example) but a system’s I/O remains stable for the life of the platform.

COM is common (no pun) in PICMG standards like COM Express, SGET standards like Q7 or SMARC, and PC/104 Consortium standards like PC/104 and EBX.

But to my knowledge, the COM concept has never been applied to VME or VPX. With these, the I/O is on the mezzanine “daughter board” while the CPU subsystem is on the base “mother board”.Pull quote

Until now.

Creative Electronic Solutions—CES—has plans to extend its product line into more 3U OpenVPX I/O carrier boards onto which are added “processor XMC” mezzanines. An example is the newer AVIO-2353 with VPX PCIe bus—meaning it plugs into a 3U VPX chassis and acts as a regular VPX I/O LRU.  By itself, it has MIL-STD-1553, ARINC-429, RS232/422/485, GPIO, and other avionics-grade goodies.

The CES ROCK-3210 VNX small form factor avionics chassis.

The CES ROCK-3210 VNX small form factor avionics chassis.

But there’s an XMC site for adding the processor, such as the company’s MFCC-8557 XMC board that uses a Freescale P3041 quad-core Power Architecture CPU. If you’re following this argument, the 3U VPX baseboard has all the I/O, while the XMC mezzanine holds the system CPU. This is a traditional COM stack, but it’s unusual to find it within the VME/VPX ecosystem.

“This is all part of CES’s focus on SWAP, high-rel, and safety-critical ground-up design,” said Wayne McGee, head of CES North America. The company is in the midst of rebranding itself and the shiny new website found at www.ces-swap.com makes their intentions known.

CES has been around since 1981 and serves high-rel platforms like the super-collider at CERN, the Predator UAV, and various Airbus airframes. The emphasis has been on mission- and safety-critical LRUs and systems “Designed for Safety” to achieve DAL-C under DO-178B/C and DO-254.

“We’ll be announcing three new products at AUVSI this year,” McGee told me, “and you can expect to see more COM-style VPX/XMC combinations with some of the latest processors.” Also to be announced will be extensions to the company’s complete VNX small form factor (SFF) chassis systems, such as a new version of the rugged open computer kit (ROCK-3x)—previously announced in February at Embedded World.

CES is new to me, and it’s great to see some different-from-the-pack innovation from an old-school company that clearly has new-school ideas. We’ll be watching closely for more ROCK and COM announcements, but still targeting small, deployable safety-certifiable systems.