print

Functional Safety, Security for IoT Stressed at Cadence Event

thumbnail

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Lip-Bu Tan, President and CEO, Cadence Design Systems

The “big trends” in the electronics industry are social, mobility, the Internet of Things, and security, Lip-Bu Tan, the president and chief executive officer of Cadence Design Systems, said Tuesday (April 5) in his keynote address at the CDNLive Cadence User Conference in Santa Clara, Calif.

He later touched on 5G wireless communications, Big Data, deep learning, and ultra-low-power devices, leading up to the concept of System Design Enablement, or SDE. “We have been changing the entire system design flow,” Tan told a capacity audience in the Santa Clara Convention Center’s Elizabeth A. Hangs Theatre.

The Cadence CEO described new products that have been introduced in the past year.

(The system design theme is also exemplified by the Electronic Design Automation Consortium renaming itself last month as the Electronic System Design Alliance.)

Tan was followed by Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf, who took “The Evolution of Connected Devices” as his theme.

“There’s tremendous innovation in front of us…providing technology at scale,” Mollenkopf said. Mobility and low-power technology are “disrupting multiple industries,” he added.

While growth in the smartphone market is slowing down, wider adoption of Long-Term Evolution communications and the introduction of augmented reality and virtual reality on handsets promise to buoy the smartphone business for years to come, according to Mollenkopf.

The description of automotive vehicles as “a phone on wheels” is not unjustified, the Qualcomm CEO observed. While the unit volume of the auto business is lower than smartphones and many electronics products, the process of adding connectivity and Internet service to cars is “just beginning,” he said.

While the IoT is “not the next savior for the [semiconductor] industry,” Mollenkopf said, the industrial IoT promises to generate valuable data for manufacturers. “We’re moving from discrete to integrated platforms,” he added.

Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf

Mollenkopf also addressed drone aircraft, 5G, and autonomous vehicles in his keynote.

Congratulating Cadence on its collaborations with Qualcomm, Mollenkopf concluded, “We need people to make it easy for us to use silicon.”

GlobalFoundries CEO Sanjay Jha was up next. He identified mobile computing, the IoT, and mission-critical/automotive applications as important considerations for the near future.

The IoT market could generate a low estimate of $3.9 trillion in the next decade, with high estimates topping out at $11.5 trillion, Jha said, citing IHS Technology, iSuppli, and other sources. The semiconductor industry could realize $50 billion to $75 billion in value from IoT-related products, “from chips to mini-systems,” he added.

GlobalFoundries, which last year acquired IBM Microlectronics, has identified several key technologies for its operations and foundry services: fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator, magnetic random-access memory, radio-frequency SOI and silicon germanium, system-in-package and other advanced packaging, FinFETs, and application-specific integrated circuits.

“Power consumption is the big differentiator,” Jha commented.

GlobalFoundries CEO Sanjay Jha

The 5-nanometer process node “will be a very expensive technology,” he said. Jha compared an extreme-ultraviolet lithography scanner (EUV technology is now expected to be production-ready for 5nm chips) to “a small Hadron Collider.”

The CDNLive Silicon Valley event was the first of 2016 for the EDA company. Similar conferences are scheduled this year for Germany, Korea, Japan, India, China, Taiwan, the eastern US (Boston), and Israel.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • TwitThis